remove some old files
authorDavid Terei <davidterei@gmail.com>
Mon, 17 Oct 2011 21:50:09 +0000 (14:50 -0700)
committerDavid Terei <davidterei@gmail.com>
Mon, 17 Oct 2011 21:50:09 +0000 (14:50 -0700)
driver/ordering-passes [deleted file]
driver/test_mangler [deleted file]

diff --git a/driver/ordering-passes b/driver/ordering-passes
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 305f3f0..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,257 +0,0 @@
-       Ordering the compiler's passes
-       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Change notes
-~~~~~~~~~~~~
-1  Nov 94      * NB: if float-out is done after strictness, remember to
-                 switch off demandedness flags on floated bindings!
-13 Oct 94      * Run Float Inwards once more after strictness-simplify [andre]
- 4 Oct 94      * Do simplification between float-in and strictness [andre]
-               * Ignore-inline-pragmas flag for final simplification [andre]
-
-Aug 94         Original: Simon, Andy, Andre
-
-
-
-
-This ordering obeys all the constraints except (5)
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-       full laziness
-       simplify with foldr/build
-       float-in
-       simplify
-       strictness
-       float-in
-
-[check FFT2 still gets benefits with this ordering]
-
-=================================
-       Constraints
-=================================
-
-1. float-in before strictness.
-Reason: floating inwards moves definitions inwards to a site at which
-the binding might well be strict.
-
-Example                let x = ... in
-                   y = x+1
-               in 
-               ...
-===>
-               let y = let x = ... in x+1
-               in ...
-
-The strictness analyser will do a better job of the latter
-than the former.
-
-2. Don't simplify between float-in and strictness,
-unless you disable float-let-out-of-let, otherwise
-the simiplifier's local floating might undo some 
-useful floating-in.
-
-Example                let f = let y = .. in \x-> x+y
-               in ...
-===>
-               let y = ... 
-                   f = \x -> x+y
-               in ...
-
-This is a bad move, because now y isn't strict.
-In the pre-float case, the binding for y is strict.
-Mind you, this isn't a very common case, and
-it's easy to disable float-let-from-let.
-
-3. Want full-laziness before foldr/build.  
-Reason: Give priority to sharing rather than deforestation.
-
-Example                \z -> let xs = build g 
-                     in foldr k z xs
-===>
-               let xs = build g
-               in \x -> foldr k z xs
-
-In the post-full-laziness case, xs is shared between all
-applications of the function.   If we did foldr/build
-first, we'd have got 
-
-               \z -> g k z
-
-and now we can't share xs.
-
-
-4.  Want strictness after foldr/build.
-Reason: foldr/build makes new function definitions which
-can benefit from strictness analysis.
-
-Example:       sum [1..10]
-===> (f/b)
-               let g x a | x > 10    = a
-                         | otherwise = g (x+1) (a+x)
-
-Here we clearly want to get strictness analysis on g.
-
-
-5.  Want full laziness after strictness
-Reason: absence may allow something to be floated out
-which would not otherwise be.
-
-Example                \z -> let x = f (a,z) in ...
-===> (absence anal + inline wrapper of f)
-               \z -> let x = f.wrk a in ...
-===> (full laziness)
-               let x= f.wrk a in  \z -> ...
-
-TOO BAD.  This doesn't look a common case to me.
-
-
-6. Want float-in after foldr/build.
-Reason: Desugaring list comprehensions + foldr/build
-gives rise to new float-in opportunities.
-
-Example                ...some list comp...
-==> (foldr/build)
-               let v = h xs in
-               case ... of
-                 []     -> v
-                 (y:ys) -> ...(t v)...
-==> (simplifier)
-               let v = h xs in
-               case ... of
-                 [] -> h xs
-                 (y:ys) -> ...(t v)...
-
-Now v could usefully be floated into the second branch.
-
-7. Want simplify after float-inwards.
-[Occurred in the prelude, compiling ITup2.hs, function dfun.Ord.(*,*)]
-This is due to the following (that happens with dictionaries):
-
-let a1 = case v of (a,b) -> a
-in let m1 = \ c -> case c of I# c# -> case c# of 1 -> a1 5
-                                                 2 -> 6
-in let m2 = \ c -> case c of I# c# -> 
-                     case c# +# 1# of cc# -> let cc = I# cc#
-                                             in m1 cc 
-   in (m1,m2)
-
-floating inwards will push the definition of a1 into m1 (supposing
-it is only used there):
-
-in let m1 = let a1 = case v of (a,b) -> a
-            in \ c -> case c of I# c# -> case c# of 1 -> a1 5
-                                                   2 -> 6
-in let m2 = \ c -> case c of I# c# -> 
-                     case c# +# 1# of cc# -> let cc = I# cc#
-                                             in m1 cc 
-   in (m1,m2)
-
-if we do strictness analysis now we will not get a worker-wrapper
-for m1, because of the "let a1 ..." (notice that a1 is not strict in
-its body).
-
-Not having this worker wrapper might be very bad, because it might
-mean that we will have to rebox arguments to m1 if they are
-already unboxed, generating extra allocations, as occurs with m2 (cc)
-above. 
-
-To solve this problem we have decided to run the simplifier after
-float-inwards, so that lets whose body is a HNF are floated out, 
-undoing the float-inwards transformation in these cases.
-We are then back to the original code, which would have a worker-wrapper
-for m1 after strictness analysis and would avoid the extra let in m2.
-
-What we lose in this case are the opportunities for case-floating 
-that could be presented if, for example, a1 would indeed be demanded (strict) 
-after the floating inwards.
-
-The only way of having the best of both is if we have the worker/wrapper
-pass explicitly called, and then we could do with 
-
-float-in
-strictness analysis
-simplify
-strictness analysis
-worker-wrapper generation
-
-as we would 
-a) be able to detect the strictness of m1 after the
-   first call to the strictness analyser, and exploit it with the simplifier
-   (in case it was strict).
-b) after the call to the simplifier (if m1 was not demanded) 
-   it would be floated out just like we currently do, before stricness
-   analysis II and worker/wrapperisation.
-
-The reason to not do worker/wrapperisation twice is to avoid 
-generating wrappers for wrappers which could happen.
-
-
-8.  If full laziness is ever done after strictness, remember to switch off
-demandedness flags on floated bindings!  This isn't done at the moment.
-
-
-Ignore-inline-pragmas flag for final simplification
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-[Occurred in the prelude, compiling ITup2.hs, function dfun.Ord.(*,*)]
-Sometimes (e.g. in dictionary methods) we generate
-worker/wrappers for functions but the wrappers are never
-inlined. In dictionaries we often have 
-
-dict = let f1 = ...
-           f2 = ...
-           ...
-       in (f1,f2,...)
-
-and if we create worker/wrappers for f1,...,fn the wrappers will not
-be inlined anywhere, and we will have ended up with extra
-closures (one for the worker and one for the wrapper) and extra
-function calls, as when we access the dictionary we will be acessing 
-the wrapper, which will call the worker.
-The simplifier never inlines workers into wrappers, as the wrappers
-themselves have INLINE pragmas attached to them (so that they are always
-inlined, and we do not know in advance how many times they will be inlined).
-
-To solve this problem, in the last call to the simplifier we will
-ignore these inline pragmas and handle the workers and the wrappers
-as normal definitions. This will allow a worker to be inlined into
-the wrapper if it satisfies all the criteria for inlining (e.g. it is
-the only occurrence of the worker etc.).
-
-Run Float Inwards once more after strictness-simplify
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-[Occurred in the prelude, compiling IInt.hs, function const.Int.index.wrk]
-When workers are generated after strictness analysis (worker/wrapper),
-we generate them with "reboxing" lets, that simply reboxes the unboxed
-arguments, as it may be the case that the worker will need the 
-original boxed value: 
-
-f x y = case x of 
-          (a,b) -> case y of 
-                     (c,d) -> case a == c of
-                                True -> (x,x)
-                                False -> ((1,1),(2,2))
-
-==> (worker/wrapper)
-
-f_wrapper x y = case x of
-                  (a,b) -> case y of 
-                             (c,d) -> f_worker a b c d 
-
-f_worker a b c d = let x = (a,b)
-                       y = (c,d)
-                   in case a == c of
-                        True -> (x,x)
-                        False -> ((1,1),(2,2))
-
-in this case the simplifier will remove the binding for y as it is not
-used (we expected this to happen very often, but we do not know how
-many "reboxers" are eventually removed and how many are kept), and
-will keep the binding for x.  But notice that x is only used in *one*
-of the branches in the case, but is always being allocated! The
-floating inwards pass would push its definition into the True branch.
-A similar benefit occurs if it is only used inside a let definition.
-These are basically the advantages of floating inwards, but they are
-only exposed after the S.A./worker-wrapperisation of the code!  As we
-also have reasons to float inwards before S.A. we have to run it
-twice.
-
diff --git a/driver/test_mangler b/driver/test_mangler
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 96cf31c..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,29 +0,0 @@
-#! /usr/bin/perl
-# a simple wrapper to test a .s-file mangler
-# reads stdin, writes stdout
-
-push(@INC,"/net/dazdak/BUILDS/gransim-4.04/i386-unknown-linux/ghc/driver");
-
-$TargetPlatform = $ARGV[0]; shift; # nice error checking, Will
-
-require("ghc-asm.prl") || die "require mangler failed!\n";
-
-$SpX86Mangling = 1;
-$StolenX86Regs = 4;
-
-open(INP, "> /tmp/mangle1.$$") || die "Can't open tmp file 1\n";
-while (<>) {
-    print INP $_;
-}
-close(INP) || die "Can't close tmp file 1";
-
-&mangle_asm("/tmp/mangle1.$$", "/tmp/mangle2.$$");
-
-open(INP, "< /tmp/mangle2.$$") || die "Can't open tmp file 2\n";
-while (<INP>) {
-    print STDOUT $_;
-}
-close(INP) || die "Can't close tmp file 2";
-
-unlink("/tmp/mangle1.$$", "/tmp/mangle2.$$");
-exit(0);