Tweak Haddock markup in GHC.Magic
authorReid Barton <rwbarton@gmail.com>
Sat, 9 Aug 2014 02:29:51 +0000 (22:29 -0400)
committerReid Barton <rwbarton@gmail.com>
Sat, 9 Aug 2014 18:07:05 +0000 (14:07 -0400)
libraries/ghc-prim/GHC/Magic.hs

index f616343..081b838 100644 (file)
 
 module GHC.Magic ( inline, lazy ) where
 
--- | The call '(inline f)' arranges that 'f' is inlined, regardless of
--- its size. More precisely, the call '(inline f)' rewrites to the
--- right-hand side of 'f'\'s definition. This allows the programmer to
+-- | The call @inline f@ arranges that 'f' is inlined, regardless of
+-- its size. More precisely, the call @inline f@ rewrites to the
+-- right-hand side of @f@'s definition. This allows the programmer to
 -- control inlining from a particular call site rather than the
 -- definition site of the function (c.f. 'INLINE' pragmas).
 --
 -- This inlining occurs regardless of the argument to the call or the
--- size of 'f'\'s definition; it is unconditional. The main caveat is
--- that 'f'\'s definition must be visible to the compiler; it is
+-- size of @f@'s definition; it is unconditional. The main caveat is
+-- that @f@'s definition must be visible to the compiler; it is
 -- therefore recommended to mark the function with an 'INLINABLE'
 -- pragma at its definition so that GHC guarantees to record its
 -- unfolding regardless of size.
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ inline :: a -> a
 inline x = x
 
 -- | The 'lazy' function restrains strictness analysis a little. The
--- call '(lazy e)' means the same as 'e', but 'lazy' has a magical
+-- call @lazy e@ means the same as 'e', but 'lazy' has a magical
 -- property so far as strictness analysis is concerned: it is lazy in
 -- its first argument, even though its semantics is strict. After
 -- strictness analysis has run, calls to 'lazy' are inlined to be the