Update Trac ticket URLs to point to GitLab
[ghc.git] / libraries / base / System / Mem / Weak.hs
index 5790105..8d21eb5 100644 (file)
@@ -1,9 +1,11 @@
+{-# LANGUAGE Trustworthy #-}
+
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 -- |
 -- Module      :  System.Mem.Weak
 -- Copyright   :  (c) The University of Glasgow 2001
 -- License     :  BSD-style (see the file libraries/base/LICENSE)
--- 
+--
 -- Maintainer  :  libraries@haskell.org
 -- Stability   :  experimental
 -- Portability :  non-portable
@@ -14,9 +16,9 @@
 -- object.  A weak pointer can be de-referenced to find out
 -- whether the object it refers to is still alive or not, and if so
 -- to return the object itself.
--- 
+--
 -- Weak pointers are particularly useful for caches and memo tables.
--- To build a memo table, you build a data structure 
+-- To build a memo table, you build a data structure
 -- mapping from the function argument (the key) to its result (the
 -- value).  When you apply the function to a new argument you first
 -- check whether the key\/value pair is already in the memo table.
 -- key and value alive.  So the table should contain a weak pointer
 -- to the key, not an ordinary pointer.  The pointer to the value must
 -- not be weak, because the only reference to the value might indeed be
--- from the memo table.   
--- 
+-- from the memo table.
+--
 -- So it looks as if the memo table will keep all its values
 -- alive for ever.  One way to solve this is to purge the table
 -- occasionally, by deleting entries whose keys have died.
--- 
+--
 -- The weak pointers in this library
 -- support another approach, called /finalization/.
 -- When the key referred to by a weak pointer dies, the storage manager
 -- arranges to run a programmer-specified finalizer.  In the case of memo
 -- tables, for example, the finalizer could remove the key\/value pair
--- from the memo table.  
--- 
+-- from the memo table.
+--
 -- Another difficulty with the memo table is that the value of a
 -- key\/value pair might itself contain a pointer to the key.
 -- So the memo table keeps the value alive, which keeps the key alive,
 -- even though there may be no other references to the key so both should
--- die.  The weak pointers in this library provide a slight 
+-- die.  The weak pointers in this library provide a slight
 -- generalisation of the basic weak-pointer idea, in which each
 -- weak pointer actually contains both a key and a value.
 --
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 module System.Mem.Weak (
-       -- * The @Weak@ type
-       Weak,                   -- abstract
-
-       -- * The general interface
-       mkWeak,                 -- :: k -> v -> Maybe (IO ()) -> IO (Weak v)
-       deRefWeak,              -- :: Weak v -> IO (Maybe v)
-       finalize,               -- :: Weak v -> IO ()
-
-       -- * Specialised versions
-       mkWeakPtr,              -- :: k -> Maybe (IO ()) -> IO (Weak k)
-       addFinalizer,           -- :: key -> IO () -> IO ()
-       mkWeakPair,             -- :: k -> v -> Maybe (IO ()) -> IO (Weak (k,v))
-       -- replaceFinaliser     -- :: Weak v -> IO () -> IO ()
-
-       -- * A precise semantics
-       
-       -- $precise
-   ) where
+        -- * The @Weak@ type
+        Weak,                   -- abstract
+
+        -- * The general interface
+        mkWeak,
+        deRefWeak,
+        finalize,
 
-import Prelude
+        -- * Specialised versions
+        mkWeakPtr,
+        addFinalizer,
+        mkWeakPair,
+        -- replaceFinaliser
 
-import Data.Typeable
+        -- * A precise semantics
 
-#ifdef __HUGS__
-import Hugs.Weak
-#endif
+        -- $precise
+
+        -- * Implementation notes
+
+        -- $notes
+   ) where
 
-#ifdef __GLASGOW_HASKELL__
 import GHC.Weak
-#endif
 
 -- | A specialised version of 'mkWeak', where the key and the value are
 -- the same object:
@@ -94,19 +90,14 @@ mkWeakPtr key finalizer = mkWeak key key finalizer
   when the key becomes unreachable).
 
   Note: adding a finalizer to a 'Foreign.ForeignPtr.ForeignPtr' using
-  'addFinalizer' won't work as well as using the specialised version
-  'Foreign.ForeignPtr.addForeignPtrFinalizer' because the latter
-  version adds the finalizer to the primitive 'ForeignPtr#' object
-  inside, whereas the generic 'addFinalizer' will add the finalizer to
-  the box.  Optimisations tend to remove the box, which may cause the
-  finalizer to run earlier than you intended.  The same motivation
-  justifies the existence of
-  'Control.Concurrent.MVar.addMVarFinalizer' and
-  'Data.IORef.mkWeakIORef' (the non-unformity is accidental).
+  'addFinalizer' won't work; use the specialised version
+  'Foreign.ForeignPtr.addForeignPtrFinalizer' instead.  For discussion
+  see the 'Weak' type.
+.
 -}
 addFinalizer :: key -> IO () -> IO ()
 addFinalizer key finalizer = do
-   mkWeakPtr key (Just finalizer)      -- throw it away
+   _ <- mkWeakPtr key (Just finalizer) -- throw it away
    return ()
 
 -- | A specialised version of 'mkWeak' where the value is actually a pair
@@ -119,8 +110,6 @@ addFinalizer key finalizer = do
 mkWeakPair :: k -> v -> Maybe (IO ()) -> IO (Weak (k,v))
 mkWeakPair key val finalizer = mkWeak key (key,val) finalizer
 
-#include "Typeable.h"
-INSTANCE_TYPEABLE1(Weak,weakTc,"Weak")
 
 {- $precise
 
@@ -141,8 +130,9 @@ The behaviour is simply this:
 This behaviour depends on what it means for a key to be reachable.
 Informally, something is reachable if it can be reached by following
 ordinary pointers from the root set, but not following weak pointers.
-We define reachability more precisely as follows A heap object is
-reachable if:
+We define reachability more precisely as follows.
+
+A heap object is /reachable/ if:
 
  * It is a member of the /root set/.
 
@@ -151,5 +141,28 @@ reachable if:
 
  * It is a weak pointer object whose key is reachable.
 
- * It is the value or finalizer of an object whose key is reachable.
+ * It is the value or finalizer of a weak pointer object whose key is reachable.
+-}
+
+{- $notes
+
+A finalizer is not always called after its weak pointer\'s object becomes
+unreachable. There are two situations that can cause this:
+
+ * If the object becomes unreachable right before the program exits,
+   then GC may not be performed. Finalizers run during GC, so finalizers
+   associated with the object do not run if GC does not happen.
+
+ * If a finalizer throws an exception, subsequent finalizers that had
+   been queued to run after it do not get run. This behavior may change
+   in a future release. See issue <https://gitlab.haskell.org/ghc/ghc/issues/13167 13167>
+   on the issue tracker. Writing a finalizer that throws exceptions is
+   discouraged.
+
+Other than these two caveats, users can always expect that a finalizer
+will be run after its weak pointer\'s object becomes unreachable. However,
+the second caveat means that users need to trust that all of their
+transitive dependencies do not throw exceptions in finalizers, since
+any finalizers can end up queued together.
+
 -}