Make diagnostics slightly more colorful
[ghc.git] / docs / users_guide / using.rst
1 .. _using-ghc:
2
3 Using GHC
4 =========
5
6 .. index::
7    single: GHC, using
8    single: using GHC
9
10 Getting started: compiling programs
11 -----------------------------------
12
13 In this chapter you'll find a complete reference to the GHC command-line
14 syntax, including all 400+ flags. It's a large and complex system, and
15 there are lots of details, so it can be quite hard to figure out how to
16 get started. With that in mind, this introductory section provides a
17 quick introduction to the basic usage of GHC for compiling a Haskell
18 program, before the following sections dive into the full syntax.
19
20 Let's create a Hello World program, and compile and run it. First,
21 create a file :file:`hello.hs` containing the Haskell code: ::
22
23     main = putStrLn "Hello, World!"
24
25 To compile the program, use GHC like this:
26
27 .. code-block:: sh
28
29     $ ghc hello.hs
30
31 (where ``$`` represents the prompt: don't type it). GHC will compile the
32 source file :file:`hello.hs`, producing an object file :file:`hello.o` and an
33 interface file :file:`hello.hi`, and then it will link the object file to
34 the libraries that come with GHC to produce an executable called
35 :file:`hello` on Unix/Linux/Mac, or :file:`hello.exe` on Windows.
36
37 By default GHC will be very quiet about what it is doing, only printing
38 error messages. If you want to see in more detail what's going on behind
39 the scenes, add :ghc-flag:`-v` to the command line.
40
41 Then we can run the program like this:
42
43 .. code-block:: sh
44
45     $ ./hello
46     Hello World!
47
48 If your program contains multiple modules, then you only need to tell
49 GHC the name of the source file containing the ``Main`` module, and GHC
50 will examine the ``import`` declarations to find the other modules that
51 make up the program and find their source files. This means that, with
52 the exception of the ``Main`` module, every source file should be named
53 after the module name that it contains (with dots replaced by directory
54 separators). For example, the module ``Data.Person`` would be in the
55 file ``Data/Person.hs`` on Unix/Linux/Mac, or ``Data\Person.hs`` on
56 Windows.
57
58 Options overview
59 ----------------
60
61 GHC's behaviour is controlled by options, which for historical reasons
62 are also sometimes referred to as command-line flags or arguments.
63 Options can be specified in three ways:
64
65 Command-line arguments
66 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
67
68 .. index::
69    single: structure, command-line
70    single: command-line; arguments
71    single: arguments; command-line
72
73 An invocation of GHC takes the following form:
74
75 .. code-block:: none
76
77     ghc [argument...]
78
79 Command-line arguments are either options or file names.
80
81 Command-line options begin with ``-``. They may *not* be grouped:
82 ``-vO`` is different from ``-v -O``. Options need not precede filenames:
83 e.g., ``ghc *.o -o foo``. All options are processed and then applied to
84 all files; you cannot, for example, invoke
85 ``ghc -c -O1 Foo.hs -O2 Bar.hs`` to apply different optimisation levels
86 to the files ``Foo.hs`` and ``Bar.hs``.
87
88 .. note::
89
90     .. index::
91        single: command-line; order of arguments
92
93     Note that command-line options are *order-dependent*, with arguments being
94     evaluated from left-to-right. This can have seemingly strange effects in the
95     presence of flag implication. For instance, consider
96     :ghc-flag:`-fno-specialise` and :ghc-flag:`-O1` (which implies
97     :ghc-flag:`-fspecialise`). These two command lines mean very different
98     things:
99
100     ``-fno-specialise -O1``
101
102         ``-fspecialise`` will be enabled as the ``-fno-specialise`` is overriden
103         by the ``-O1``.
104
105     ``-O1 -fno-specialise``
106
107         ``-fspecialise`` will not be enabled, since the ``-fno-specialise``
108         overrides the ``-fspecialise`` implied by ``-O1``.
109
110 .. _source-file-options:
111
112 Command line options in source files
113 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
114
115 .. index::
116    single: source-file options
117
118 Sometimes it is useful to make the connection between a source file and
119 the command-line options it requires quite tight. For instance, if a
120 Haskell source file deliberately uses name shadowing, it should be
121 compiled with the ``-Wno-name-shadowing`` option. Rather than
122 maintaining the list of per-file options in a ``Makefile``, it is
123 possible to do this directly in the source file using the
124 ``OPTIONS_GHC`` :ref:`pragma <options-pragma>` ::
125
126     {-# OPTIONS_GHC -Wno-name-shadowing #-}
127     module X where
128     ...
129
130 ``OPTIONS_GHC`` is a *file-header pragma* (see :ref:`options-pragma`).
131
132 Only *dynamic* flags can be used in an ``OPTIONS_GHC`` pragma (see
133 :ref:`static-dynamic-flags`).
134
135 Note that your command shell does not get to the source file options,
136 they are just included literally in the array of command-line arguments
137 the compiler maintains internally, so you'll be desperately disappointed
138 if you try to glob etc. inside ``OPTIONS_GHC``.
139
140 .. note::
141    The contents of ``OPTIONS_GHC`` are appended to the command-line
142    options, so options given in the source file override those given on the
143    command-line.
144
145 It is not recommended to move all the contents of your Makefiles into
146 your source files, but in some circumstances, the ``OPTIONS_GHC`` pragma
147 is the Right Thing. (If you use :ghc-flag:`-keep-hc-file` and have ``OPTION`` flags in
148 your module, the ``OPTIONS_GHC`` will get put into the generated ``.hc`` file).
149
150 Setting options in GHCi
151 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
152
153 Options may also be modified from within GHCi, using the :ghci-cmd:`:set`
154 command.
155
156 .. _static-dynamic-flags:
157
158 Static, Dynamic, and Mode options
159 ---------------------------------
160
161 .. index::
162    single: static; options
163    single: dynamic; options
164    single: mode; options
165
166 Each of GHC's command line options is classified as static, dynamic or
167 mode:
168
169     For example, :ghc-flag:`--make` or :ghc-flag:`-E`. There may only be a single mode
170     flag on the command line. The available modes are listed in
171     :ref:`modes`.
172
173     Most non-mode flags fall into this category. A dynamic flag may be
174     used on the command line, in a ``OPTIONS_GHC`` pragma in a source
175     file, or set using :ghci-cmd:`:set` in GHCi.
176
177     A few flags are "static", which means they can only be used on the
178     command-line, and remain in force over the entire GHC/GHCi run.
179
180 The flag reference tables (:ref:`flag-reference`) lists the status of
181 each flag.
182
183 There are a few flags that are static except that they can also be used
184 with GHCi's :ghci-cmd:`:set` command; these are listed as “static/\ ``:set``\ ”
185 in the table.
186
187 .. _file-suffixes:
188
189 Meaningful file suffixes
190 ------------------------
191
192 .. index::
193    single: suffixes, file
194    single: file suffixes for GHC
195
196 File names with "meaningful" suffixes (e.g., ``.lhs`` or ``.o``) cause
197 the "right thing" to happen to those files.
198
199 ``.hs``
200     A Haskell module.
201
202 ``.lhs``
203     .. index::
204        single: lhs file extension
205
206     A “literate Haskell” module.
207
208 ``.hspp``
209     A file created by the preprocessor.
210
211 ``.hi``
212     A Haskell interface file, probably compiler-generated.
213
214 ``.hc``
215     Intermediate C file produced by the Haskell compiler.
216
217 ``.c``
218     A C file not produced by the Haskell compiler.
219
220 ``.ll``
221     An llvm-intermediate-language source file, usually produced by the
222     compiler.
223
224 ``.bc``
225     An llvm-intermediate-language bitcode file, usually produced by the
226     compiler.
227
228 ``.s``
229     An assembly-language source file, usually produced by the compiler.
230
231 ``.o``
232     An object file, produced by an assembler.
233
234 Files with other suffixes (or without suffixes) are passed straight to
235 the linker.
236
237 .. _modes:
238
239 Modes of operation
240 ------------------
241
242 .. index::
243    single: help options
244
245 GHC's behaviour is firstly controlled by a mode flag. Only one of these
246 flags may be given, but it does not necessarily need to be the first
247 option on the command-line. For instance,
248
249 .. code-block:: none
250
251     $ ghc Main.hs --make -o my-application
252
253 If no mode flag is present, then GHC will enter :ghc-flag:`--make` mode
254 (:ref:`make-mode`) if there are any Haskell source files given on the
255 command line, or else it will link the objects named on the command line
256 to produce an executable.
257
258 The available mode flags are:
259
260 .. ghc-flag:: --interactive
261
262     .. index::
263        single: interactive mode
264        single: GHCi
265
266     Interactive mode, which is also available as :program:`ghci`. Interactive
267     mode is described in more detail in :ref:`ghci`.
268
269 .. ghc-flag:: --make
270
271     .. index::
272        single: make mode; of GHC
273
274     In this mode, GHC will build a multi-module Haskell program
275     automatically, figuring out dependencies for itself. If you have a
276     straightforward Haskell program, this is likely to be much easier,
277     and faster, than using :command:`make`. Make mode is described in
278     :ref:`make-mode`.
279
280     This mode is the default if there are any Haskell source files
281     mentioned on the command line, and in this case the :ghc-flag:`--make`
282     option can be omitted.
283
284 .. ghc-flag:: -e ⟨expr⟩
285
286     .. index::
287        single: eval mode; of GHC
288
289     Expression-evaluation mode. This is very similar to interactive
290     mode, except that there is a single expression to evaluate (⟨expr⟩)
291     which is given on the command line. See :ref:`eval-mode` for more
292     details.
293
294 .. ghc-flag:: -E
295               -C
296               -S
297               -c
298
299     This is the traditional batch-compiler mode, in which GHC can
300     compile source files one at a time, or link objects together into an
301     executable. See :ref:`options-order`.
302
303 .. ghc-flag:: -M
304
305     .. index::
306         single: dependency-generation mode; of GHC
307
308     Dependency-generation mode. In this mode, GHC can be used to
309     generate dependency information suitable for use in a ``Makefile``.
310     See :ref:`makefile-dependencies`.
311
312 .. ghc-flag:: --frontend <module>
313
314     .. index::
315         single: frontend plugins; using
316
317     Run GHC using the given frontend plugin. See :ref:`frontend_plugins` for
318     details.
319
320 .. ghc-flag:: --mk-dll
321
322     .. index::
323        single: DLL-creation mode
324
325     DLL-creation mode (Windows only). See :ref:`win32-dlls-create`.
326
327 .. ghc-flag:: --help
328               -?
329
330     Cause GHC to spew a long usage message to standard output and then
331     exit.
332
333 .. ghc-flag:: --show-iface ⟨file⟩
334
335     Read the interface in ⟨file⟩ and dump it as text to ``stdout``. For
336     example ``ghc --show-iface M.hi``.
337
338 .. ghc-flag:: --supported-extensions
339               --supported-languages
340
341     Print the supported language extensions.
342
343 .. ghc-flag:: --show-options
344
345     Print the supported command line options. This flag can be used for
346     autocompletion in a shell.
347
348 .. ghc-flag:: --info
349
350     Print information about the compiler.
351
352 .. ghc-flag:: --version
353               -V
354
355     Print a one-line string including GHC's version number.
356
357 .. ghc-flag:: --numeric-version
358
359     Print GHC's numeric version number only.
360
361 .. ghc-flag:: --print-libdir
362
363     .. index::
364        single: libdir
365
366     Print the path to GHC's library directory. This is the top of the
367     directory tree containing GHC's libraries, interfaces, and include
368     files (usually something like ``/usr/local/lib/ghc-5.04`` on Unix).
369     This is the value of ``$libdir`` in the package
370     configuration file (see :ref:`packages`).
371
372 .. _make-mode:
373
374 Using ``ghc`` ``--make``
375 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
376
377 .. index::
378    single: --make; mode of GHC
379    single: separate compilation
380
381 In this mode, GHC will build a multi-module Haskell program by following
382 dependencies from one or more root modules (usually just ``Main``). For
383 example, if your ``Main`` module is in a file called :file:`Main.hs`, you
384 could compile and link the program like this:
385
386 .. code-block:: none
387
388     ghc --make Main.hs
389
390 In fact, GHC enters make mode automatically if there are any Haskell
391 source files on the command line and no other mode is specified, so in
392 this case we could just type
393
394 .. code-block:: none
395
396     ghc Main.hs
397
398 Any number of source file names or module names may be specified; GHC
399 will figure out all the modules in the program by following the imports
400 from these initial modules. It will then attempt to compile each module
401 which is out of date, and finally, if there is a ``Main`` module, the
402 program will also be linked into an executable.
403
404 The main advantages to using ``ghc --make`` over traditional
405 ``Makefile``\s are:
406
407 -  GHC doesn't have to be restarted for each compilation, which means it
408    can cache information between compilations. Compiling a multi-module
409    program with ``ghc --make`` can be up to twice as fast as running
410    ``ghc`` individually on each source file.
411
412 -  You don't have to write a ``Makefile``.
413
414    .. index::
415       single: Makefiles; avoiding
416
417 -  GHC re-calculates the dependencies each time it is invoked, so the
418    dependencies never get out of sync with the source.
419
420 -  Using the :ghc-flag:`-j` flag, you can compile modules in parallel. Specify
421    ``-j⟨N⟩`` to compile ⟨N⟩ jobs in parallel. If N is omitted,
422    then it defaults to the number of processors.
423
424 Any of the command-line options described in the rest of this chapter
425 can be used with ``--make``, but note that any options you give on the
426 command line will apply to all the source files compiled, so if you want
427 any options to apply to a single source file only, you'll need to use an
428 ``OPTIONS_GHC`` pragma (see :ref:`source-file-options`).
429
430 If the program needs to be linked with additional objects (say, some
431 auxiliary C code), then the object files can be given on the command
432 line and GHC will include them when linking the executable.
433
434 For backward compatibility with existing make scripts, when used in
435 combination with :ghc-flag:`-c`, the linking phase is omitted (same as
436 ``--make -no-link``).
437
438 Note that GHC can only follow dependencies if it has the source file
439 available, so if your program includes a module for which there is no
440 source file, even if you have an object and an interface file for the
441 module, then GHC will complain. The exception to this rule is for
442 package modules, which may or may not have source files.
443
444 The source files for the program don't all need to be in the same
445 directory; the :ghc-flag:`-i` option can be used to add directories to the
446 search path (see :ref:`search-path`).
447
448 .. ghc-flag:: -j [N]
449
450     Perform compilation in parallel when possible. GHC will use up to ⟨N⟩
451     threads during compilation. If N is omitted, then it defaults to the
452     number of processors. Note that compilation of a module may not begin
453     until its dependencies have been built.
454
455 .. _eval-mode:
456
457 Expression evaluation mode
458 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
459
460 This mode is very similar to interactive mode, except that there is a
461 single expression to evaluate which is specified on the command line as
462 an argument to the ``-e`` option:
463
464 .. code-block:: none
465
466     ghc -e expr
467
468 Haskell source files may be named on the command line, and they will be
469 loaded exactly as in interactive mode. The expression is evaluated in
470 the context of the loaded modules.
471
472 For example, to load and run a Haskell program containing a module
473 ``Main``, we might say:
474
475 .. code-block:: none
476
477     ghc -e Main.main Main.hs
478
479 or we can just use this mode to evaluate expressions in the context of
480 the ``Prelude``:
481
482 .. code-block:: none
483
484     $ ghc -e "interact (unlines.map reverse.lines)"
485     hello
486     olleh
487
488 .. _options-order:
489
490 Batch compiler mode
491 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
492
493 In *batch mode*, GHC will compile one or more source files given on the
494 command line.
495
496 The first phase to run is determined by each input-file suffix, and the
497 last phase is determined by a flag. If no relevant flag is present, then
498 go all the way through to linking. This table summarises:
499
500 +-----------------------------------+------------------------------+----------------------------+---------------------------+
501 | Phase of the compilation system   | Suffix saying “start here”   | Flag saying “stop after”   | (suffix of) output file   |
502 +===================================+==============================+============================+===========================+
503 | literate pre-processor            | ``.lhs``                     |                            | ``.hs``                   |
504 +-----------------------------------+------------------------------+----------------------------+---------------------------+
505 | C pre-processor (opt.)            | ``.hs`` (with ``-cpp``)      | ``-E``                     | ``.hspp``                 |
506 +-----------------------------------+------------------------------+----------------------------+---------------------------+
507 | Haskell compiler                  | ``.hs``                      | ``-C``, ``-S``             | ``.hc``, ``.s``           |
508 +-----------------------------------+------------------------------+----------------------------+---------------------------+
509 | C compiler (opt.)                 | ``.hc`` or ``.c``            | ``-S``                     | ``.s``                    |
510 +-----------------------------------+------------------------------+----------------------------+---------------------------+
511 | assembler                         | ``.s``                       | ``-c``                     | ``.o``                    |
512 +-----------------------------------+------------------------------+----------------------------+---------------------------+
513 | linker                            | ⟨other⟩                      |                            | ``a.out``                 |
514 +-----------------------------------+------------------------------+----------------------------+---------------------------+
515
516 .. index::
517    single: -C
518    single: -E
519    single: -S
520    single: -c
521
522 Thus, a common invocation would be:
523
524 .. code-block:: none
525
526     ghc -c Foo.hs
527
528 to compile the Haskell source file ``Foo.hs`` to an object file
529 ``Foo.o``.
530
531 .. note::
532    What the Haskell compiler proper produces depends on what backend
533    code generator is used. See :ref:`code-generators` for more details.
534
535 .. note::
536    Pre-processing is optional, the :ghc-flag:`-cpp` flag turns it
537    on. See :ref:`c-pre-processor` for more details.
538
539 .. note::
540    The option :ghc-flag:`-E` runs just the pre-processing passes of
541    the compiler, dumping the result in a file.
542
543 .. note::
544    The option :ghc-flag:`-C` is only available when GHC is built in
545    unregisterised mode. See :ref:`unreg` for more details.
546
547 .. _overriding-suffixes:
548
549 Overriding the default behaviour for a file
550 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
551
552 As described above, the way in which a file is processed by GHC depends
553 on its suffix. This behaviour can be overridden using the :ghc-flag:`-x` option:
554
555 .. ghc-flag:: -x <suffix>
556
557     Causes all files following this option on the command line to be
558     processed as if they had the suffix ⟨suffix⟩. For example, to
559     compile a Haskell module in the file ``M.my-hs``, use
560     ``ghc -c -x hs M.my-hs``.
561
562 .. _options-help:
563
564 Verbosity options
565 -----------------
566
567 .. index::
568    single: verbosity options
569
570 See also the ``--help``, ``--version``, ``--numeric-version``, and
571 ``--print-libdir`` modes in :ref:`modes`.
572
573 .. ghc-flag:: -v
574
575     The :ghc-flag:`-v` option makes GHC *verbose*: it reports its version number
576     and shows (on stderr) exactly how it invokes each phase of the
577     compilation system. Moreover, it passes the ``-v`` flag to most
578     phases; each reports its version number (and possibly some other
579     information).
580
581     Please, oh please, use the ``-v`` option when reporting bugs!
582     Knowing that you ran the right bits in the right order is always the
583     first thing we want to verify.
584
585 .. ghc-flag:: -v ⟨n⟩
586     :noindex:
587
588     To provide more control over the compiler's verbosity, the ``-v``
589     flag takes an optional numeric argument. Specifying ``-v`` on its
590     own is equivalent to ``-v3``, and the other levels have the
591     following meanings:
592
593     ``-v0``
594         Disable all non-essential messages (this is the default).
595
596     ``-v1``
597         Minimal verbosity: print one line per compilation (this is the
598         default when :ghc-flag:`--make` or :ghc-flag:`--interactive` is on).
599
600     ``-v2``
601         Print the name of each compilation phase as it is executed.
602         (equivalent to :ghc-flag:`-dshow-passes`).
603
604     ``-v3``
605         The same as ``-v2``, except that in addition the full command
606         line (if appropriate) for each compilation phase is also
607         printed.
608
609     ``-v4``
610         The same as ``-v3`` except that the intermediate program
611         representation after each compilation phase is also printed
612         (excluding preprocessed and C/assembly files).
613
614 .. ghc-flag:: -fprint-potential-instances
615
616     When GHC can't find an instance for a class, it displays a short
617     list of some in the instances it knows about. With this flag it
618     prints *all* the instances it knows about.
619
620
621 The following flags control the way in which GHC displays types in error
622 messages and in GHCi:
623
624 .. ghc-flag:: -fprint-unicode-syntax
625
626     When enabled GHC prints type signatures using the unicode symbols from the
627     :ghc-flag:`-XUnicodeSyntax` extension. For instance,
628
629     .. code-block:: none
630
631         ghci> :set -fprint-unicode-syntax
632         ghci> :t (>>)
633         (>>) :: ∀ (m :: * → *) a b. Monad m ⇒ m a → m b → m b
634
635 .. _pretty-printing-types:
636     
637 .. ghc-flag:: -fprint-explicit-foralls
638
639     Using :ghc-flag:`-fprint-explicit-foralls` makes
640     GHC print explicit ``forall`` quantification at the top level of a
641     type; normally this is suppressed. For example, in GHCi:
642
643     .. code-block:: none
644
645         ghci> let f x = x
646         ghci> :t f
647         f :: a -> a
648         ghci> :set -fprint-explicit-foralls
649         ghci> :t f
650         f :: forall a. a -> a
651
652     However, regardless of the flag setting, the quantifiers are printed
653     under these circumstances:
654
655     -  For nested ``foralls``, e.g.
656
657        .. code-block:: none
658
659            ghci> :t GHC.ST.runST
660            GHC.ST.runST :: (forall s. GHC.ST.ST s a) -> a
661
662     -  If any of the quantified type variables has a kind that mentions
663        a kind variable, e.g.
664
665        .. code-block:: none
666
667            ghci> :i Data.Type.Equality.sym
668            Data.Type.Equality.sym ::
669              forall (k :: BOX) (a :: k) (b :: k).
670              (a Data.Type.Equality.:~: b) -> b Data.Type.Equality.:~: a
671                    -- Defined in Data.Type.Equality
672
673 .. ghc-flag:: -fprint-explicit-kinds
674
675     Using :ghc-flag:`-fprint-explicit-kinds` makes GHC print kind arguments in
676     types, which are normally suppressed. This can be important when you
677     are using kind polymorphism. For example:
678
679     .. code-block:: none
680
681         ghci> :set -XPolyKinds
682         ghci> data T a = MkT
683         ghci> :t MkT
684         MkT :: forall (k :: BOX) (a :: k). T a
685         ghci> :set -fprint-explicit-foralls
686         ghci> :t MkT
687         MkT :: forall (k :: BOX) (a :: k). T k a
688
689 .. ghc-flag:: -fprint-explicit-runtime-reps
690
691     When :ghc-flag:`-fprint-explicit-runtime-reps` is enabled, GHC prints
692     ``RuntimeRep`` type variables for runtime-representation-polymorphic types.
693     Otherwise GHC will default these to ``PtrRepLifted``. For example,
694
695     .. code-block:: none
696
697         ghci> :t ($)
698         ($) :: (a -> b) -> a -> b
699         ghci> :set -fprint-explicit-runtime-reps
700         ghci> :t ($)
701         ($)
702           :: forall (r :: GHC.Types.RuntimeRep) a (b :: TYPE r).
703              (a -> b) -> a -> b
704
705 .. ghc-flag:: -fprint-explicit-coercions
706
707     Using :ghc-flag:`-fprint-explicit-coercions` makes GHC print coercions in
708     types. When trying to prove the equality between types of different
709     kinds, GHC uses type-level coercions. Users will rarely need to
710     see these, as they are meant to be internal.
711
712 .. ghc-flag:: -fprint-equality-relations
713
714     Using :ghc-flag:`-fprint-equality-relations` tells GHC to distinguish between
715     its equality relations when printing. For example, ``~`` is homogeneous
716     lifted equality (the kinds of its arguments are the same) while
717     ``~~`` is heterogeneous lifted equality (the kinds of its arguments
718     might be different) and ``~#`` is heterogeneous unlifted equality,
719     the internal equality relation used in GHC's solver. Generally,
720     users should not need to worry about the subtleties here; ``~`` is
721     probably what you want. Without :ghc-flag:`-fprint-equality-relations`, GHC
722     prints all of these as ``~``. See also :ref:`equality-constraints`.
723
724 .. ghc-flag:: -fprint-expanded-synonyms
725
726     When enabled, GHC also prints type-synonym-expanded types in type
727     errors. For example, with this type synonyms: ::
728
729         type Foo = Int
730         type Bar = Bool
731         type MyBarST s = ST s Bar
732
733     This error message:
734
735     .. code-block:: none
736
737         Couldn't match type 'Int' with 'Bool'
738         Expected type: ST s Foo
739           Actual type: MyBarST s
740
741     Becomes this:
742
743     .. code-block:: none
744
745         Couldn't match type 'Int' with 'Bool'
746         Expected type: ST s Foo
747           Actual type: MyBarST s
748         Type synonyms expanded:
749         Expected type: ST s Int
750           Actual type: ST s Bool
751
752 .. ghc-flag:: -fprint-typechecker-elaboration
753
754     When enabled, GHC also prints extra information from the typechecker in
755     warnings. For example: ::
756
757         main :: IO ()
758         main = do
759           return $ let a = "hello" in a
760           return ()
761
762     This warning message:
763
764     .. code-block:: none
765
766         A do-notation statement discarded a result of type ‘[Char]’
767         Suppress this warning by saying
768           ‘_ <- ($) return let a = "hello" in a’
769         or by using the flag -fno-warn-unused-do-bind
770
771     Becomes this:
772
773     .. code-block:: none
774
775         A do-notation statement discarded a result of type ‘[Char]’
776         Suppress this warning by saying
777           ‘_ <- ($)
778                   return
779                   let
780                     AbsBinds [] []
781                       {Exports: [a <= a
782                                    <>]
783                        Exported types: a :: [Char]
784                                        [LclId, Str=DmdType]
785                        Binds: a = "hello"}
786                   in a’
787         or by using the flag -fno-warn-unused-do-bind
788
789 .. ghc-flag:: -fdiagnostics-color=(always|auto|never)
790
791     Causes GHC to display error messages with colors.  To do this, the
792     terminal must have support for ANSI color codes, or else garbled text will
793     appear.  The default value is `auto`, which means GHC will make an attempt
794     to detect whether terminal supports colors and choose accordingly.  (Note:
795     the detection mechanism is not yet implemented, so colors are off by
796     default on all platforms.)
797
798 .. ghc-flag:: -ferror-spans
799
800     Causes GHC to emit the full source span of the syntactic entity
801     relating to an error message. Normally, GHC emits the source
802     location of the start of the syntactic entity only.
803
804     For example:
805
806     .. code-block:: none
807
808         test.hs:3:6: parse error on input `where'
809
810     becomes:
811
812     .. code-block:: none
813
814         test296.hs:3:6-10: parse error on input `where'
815
816     And multi-line spans are possible too:
817
818     .. code-block:: none
819
820         test.hs:(5,4)-(6,7):
821             Conflicting definitions for `a'
822             Bound at: test.hs:5:4
823                       test.hs:6:7
824             In the binding group for: a, b, a
825
826     Note that line numbers start counting at one, but column numbers
827     start at zero. This choice was made to follow existing convention
828     (i.e. this is how Emacs does it).
829
830 .. ghc-flag:: -H <size>
831
832     Set the minimum size of the heap to ⟨size⟩. This option is
833     equivalent to ``+RTS -Hsize``, see :ref:`rts-options-gc`.
834
835 .. ghc-flag:: -Rghc-timing
836
837     Prints a one-line summary of timing statistics for the GHC run. This
838     option is equivalent to ``+RTS -tstderr``, see
839     :ref:`rts-options-gc`.
840
841 .. _options-platform:
842
843 Platform-specific Flags
844 -----------------------
845
846 .. index::
847    single: -m\* options
848    single: platform-specific options
849    single: machine-specific options
850
851 Some flags only make sense for particular target platforms.
852
853 .. ghc-flag:: -msse2
854
855     (x86 only, added in GHC 7.0.1) Use the SSE2 registers and
856     instruction set to implement floating point operations when using
857     the :ref:`native code generator <native-code-gen>`. This gives a
858     substantial performance improvement for floating point, but the
859     resulting compiled code will only run on processors that support
860     SSE2 (Intel Pentium 4 and later, or AMD Athlon 64 and later). The
861     :ref:`LLVM backend <llvm-code-gen>` will also use SSE2 if your
862     processor supports it but detects this automatically so no flag is
863     required.
864
865     SSE2 is unconditionally used on x86-64 platforms.
866
867 .. ghc-flag:: -msse4.2
868     :noindex:
869
870     (x86 only, added in GHC 7.4.1) Use the SSE4.2 instruction set to
871     implement some floating point and bit operations when using the
872     :ref:`native code generator <native-code-gen>`. The resulting compiled
873     code will only run on processors that support SSE4.2 (Intel Core i7
874     and later). The :ref:`LLVM backend <llvm-code-gen>` will also use
875     SSE4.2 if your processor supports it but detects this automatically
876     so no flag is required.