4a3e02e83edfc32ee7a8e547c72e1e1719ab6051
[ghc.git] / docs / users_guide / extending_ghc.rst
1 .. _extending-ghc:
2
3 Extending and using GHC as a Library
4 ====================================
5
6 GHC exposes its internal APIs to users through the built-in ghc package.
7 It allows you to write programs that leverage GHC's entire compilation
8 driver, in order to analyze or compile Haskell code programmatically.
9 Furthermore, GHC gives users the ability to load compiler plugins during
10 compilation - modules which are allowed to view and change GHC's
11 internal intermediate representation, Core. Plugins are suitable for
12 things like experimental optimizations or analysis, and offer a lower
13 barrier of entry to compiler development for many common cases.
14
15 Furthermore, GHC offers a lightweight annotation mechanism that you can
16 use to annotate your source code with metadata, which you can later
17 inspect with either the compiler API or a compiler plugin.
18
19 .. _annotation-pragmas:
20
21 Source annotations
22 ------------------
23
24 Annotations are small pragmas that allow you to attach data to
25 identifiers in source code, which are persisted when compiled. These
26 pieces of data can then inspected and utilized when using GHC as a
27 library or writing a compiler plugin.
28
29 .. _ann-pragma:
30
31 Annotating values
32 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
33
34 .. index::
35    single: ANN pragma
36    single: pragma; ANN
37    single: source annotations
38
39 Any expression that has both ``Typeable`` and ``Data`` instances may be
40 attached to a top-level value binding using an ``ANN`` pragma. In
41 particular, this means you can use ``ANN`` to annotate data constructors
42 (e.g. ``Just``) as well as normal values (e.g. ``take``). By way of
43 example, to annotate the function ``foo`` with the annotation
44 ``Just "Hello"`` you would do this:
45
46 ::
47
48     {-# ANN foo (Just "Hello") #-}
49     foo = ...
50
51 A number of restrictions apply to use of annotations:
52
53 -  The binder being annotated must be at the top level (i.e. no nested
54    binders)
55
56 -  The binder being annotated must be declared in the current module
57
58 -  The expression you are annotating with must have a type with
59    ``Typeable`` and ``Data`` instances
60
61 -  The :ref:`Template Haskell staging restrictions <th-usage>` apply to the
62    expression being annotated with, so for example you cannot run a
63    function from the module being compiled.
64
65    To be precise, the annotation ``{-# ANN x e #-}`` is well staged if
66    and only if ``$(e)`` would be (disregarding the usual type
67    restrictions of the splice syntax, and the usual restriction on
68    splicing inside a splice - ``$([|1|])`` is fine as an annotation,
69    albeit redundant).
70
71 If you feel strongly that any of these restrictions are too onerous,
72 :ghc-wiki:`please give the GHC team a shout <MailingListsAndIRC>`.
73
74 However, apart from these restrictions, many things are allowed,
75 including expressions which are not fully evaluated! Annotation
76 expressions will be evaluated by the compiler just like Template Haskell
77 splices are. So, this annotation is fine:
78
79 ::
80
81     {-# ANN f SillyAnnotation { foo = (id 10) + $([| 20 |]), bar = 'f } #-}
82     f = ...
83
84 .. _typeann-pragma:
85
86 Annotating types
87 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
88
89 .. index::
90    single: ANN pragma; on types
91
92 You can annotate types with the ``ANN`` pragma by using the ``type``
93 keyword. For example:
94
95 ::
96
97     {-# ANN type Foo (Just "A `Maybe String' annotation") #-}
98     data Foo = ...
99
100 .. _modann-pragma:
101
102 Annotating modules
103 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
104
105 .. index::
106    single: ANN pragma; on modules
107
108 You can annotate modules with the ``ANN`` pragma by using the ``module``
109 keyword. For example:
110
111 ::
112
113     {-# ANN module (Just "A `Maybe String' annotation") #-}
114
115 .. _ghc-as-a-library:
116
117 Using GHC as a Library
118 ----------------------
119
120 The ``ghc`` package exposes most of GHC's frontend to users, and thus
121 allows you to write programs that leverage it. This library is actually
122 the same library used by GHC's internal, frontend compilation driver,
123 and thus allows you to write tools that programmatically compile source
124 code and inspect it. Such functionality is useful in order to write
125 things like IDE or refactoring tools. As a simple example, here's a
126 program which compiles a module, much like ghc itself does by default
127 when invoked:
128
129 ::
130
131     import GHC
132     import GHC.Paths ( libdir )
133     import DynFlags ( defaultLogAction )
134      
135     main = 
136         defaultErrorHandler defaultLogAction $ do
137           runGhc (Just libdir) $ do
138             dflags <- getSessionDynFlags
139             setSessionDynFlags dflags
140             target <- guessTarget "test_main.hs" Nothing
141             setTargets [target]
142             load LoadAllTargets
143
144 The argument to ``runGhc`` is a bit tricky. GHC needs this to find its
145 libraries, so the argument must refer to the directory that is printed
146 by ``ghc --print-libdir`` for the same version of GHC that the program
147 is being compiled with. Above we therefore use the ``ghc-paths`` package
148 which provides this for us.
149
150 Compiling it results in:
151
152 .. code-block:: none
153
154     $ cat test_main.hs
155     main = putStrLn "hi"
156     $ ghc -package ghc simple_ghc_api.hs
157     [1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( simple_ghc_api.hs, simple_ghc_api.o )
158     Linking simple_ghc_api ...
159     $ ./simple_ghc_api
160     $ ./test_main 
161     hi
162     $
163
164 For more information on using the API, as well as more samples and
165 references, please see `this Haskell.org wiki
166 page <http://haskell.org/haskellwiki/GHC/As_a_library>`__.
167
168 .. _compiler-plugins:
169
170 Compiler Plugins
171 ----------------
172
173 GHC has the ability to load compiler plugins at compile time. The
174 feature is similar to the one provided by
175 `GCC <http://gcc.gnu.org/wiki/plugins>`__, and allows users to write
176 plugins that can adjust the behaviour of the constraint solver, inspect
177 and modify the compilation pipeline, as well as transform and inspect
178 GHC's intermediate language, Core. Plugins are suitable for experimental
179 analysis or optimization, and require no changes to GHC's source code to
180 use.
181
182 Plugins cannot optimize/inspect C--, nor can they implement things like
183 parser/front-end modifications like GCC, apart from limited changes to
184 the constraint solver. If you feel strongly that any of these
185 restrictions are too onerous,
186 :ghc-wiki:`please give the GHC team a shout <MailingListsAndIRC>`.
187
188 .. _using-compiler-plugins:
189
190 Using compiler plugins
191 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
192
193 Plugins can be specified on the command line with the
194 :ghc-flag:`-fplugin=⟨module⟩` option where ⟨module⟩ is a
195 module in a registered package that exports a plugin. Arguments can be given to
196 plugins with the :ghc-flag:`-fplugin-opt=⟨module⟩:⟨args⟩` option.
197
198 .. ghc-flag:: -fplugin=⟨module⟩
199
200     Load the plugin in the given module. The module must be a member of a
201     package registered in GHC's package database.
202
203 .. ghc-flag:: -fplugin-opt=⟨module⟩:⟨args⟩
204
205     Pass arguments ⟨args⟩ to the given plugin.
206
207 As an example, in order to load the plugin exported by ``Foo.Plugin`` in
208 the package ``foo-ghc-plugin``, and give it the parameter "baz", we
209 would invoke GHC like this:
210
211 .. code-block:: none
212
213     $ ghc -fplugin Foo.Plugin -fplugin-opt Foo.Plugin:baz Test.hs
214     [1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( Test.hs, Test.o )
215     Loading package ghc-prim ... linking ... done.
216     Loading package integer-gmp ... linking ... done.
217     Loading package base ... linking ... done.
218     Loading package ffi-1.0 ... linking ... done.
219     Loading package foo-ghc-plugin-0.1 ... linking ... done.
220     ...
221     Linking Test ...
222     $
223
224 Plugin modules live in a separate namespace from
225 the user import namespace.  By default, these two namespaces are
226 the same; however, there are a few command line options which
227 control specifically plugin packages:
228
229 .. ghc-flag:: -plugin-package ⟨pkg⟩
230
231     This option causes the installed package ⟨pkg⟩ to be exposed for plugins,
232     such as :ghc-flag:`-fplugin=⟨module⟩`. The package ⟨pkg⟩ can be specified
233     in full with its version number (e.g.  ``network-1.0``) or the version
234     number can be omitted if there is only one version of the package
235     installed. If there are multiple versions of ⟨pkg⟩ installed and
236     :ghc-flag:`-hide-all-plugin-packages` was not specified, then all other
237     versions will become hidden.  :ghc-flag:`-plugin-package ⟨pkg⟩` supports
238     thinning and renaming described in :ref:`package-thinning-and-renaming`.
239
240     Unlike :ghc-flag:`-package ⟨pkg⟩`, this option does NOT cause package ⟨pkg⟩
241     to be linked into the resulting executable or shared object.
242
243 .. ghc-flag:: -plugin-package-id ⟨pkg-id⟩
244
245     Exposes a package in the plugin namespace like :ghc-flag:`-plugin-package
246     ⟨pkg⟩`, but the package is named by its installed package ID rather than by
247     name.  This is a more robust way to name packages, and can be used to
248     select packages that would otherwise be shadowed. Cabal passes
249     :ghc-flag:`-plugin-package-id ⟨pkg-id⟩` flags to GHC.
250     :ghc-flag:`-plugin-package-id ⟨pkg-id⟩` supports thinning and renaming
251     described in :ref:`package-thinning-and-renaming`.
252
253 .. ghc-flag:: -hide-all-plugin-packages
254
255     By default, all exposed packages in the normal, source import namespace are
256     also available for plugins.  This causes those packages to be hidden by
257     default.  If you use this flag, then any packages with plugins you require
258     need to be explicitly exposed using :ghc-flag:`-plugin-package ⟨pkg⟩`
259     options.
260
261 At the moment, the only way to specify a dependency on a plugin
262 in Cabal is to put it in ``build-depends`` (which uses the conventional
263 :ghc-flag:`-package-id ⟨unit-id⟩` flag); however, in the future there
264 will be a separate field for specifying plugin dependencies specifically.
265
266 .. _writing-compiler-plugins:
267
268 Writing compiler plugins
269 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
270
271 Plugins are modules that export at least a single identifier,
272 ``plugin``, of type ``GhcPlugins.Plugin``. All plugins should
273 ``import GhcPlugins`` as it defines the interface to the compilation
274 pipeline.
275
276 A ``Plugin`` effectively holds a function which installs a compilation
277 pass into the compiler pipeline. By default there is the empty plugin
278 which does nothing, ``GhcPlugins.defaultPlugin``, which you should
279 override with record syntax to specify your installation function. Since
280 the exact fields of the ``Plugin`` type are open to change, this is the
281 best way to ensure your plugins will continue to work in the future with
282 minimal interface impact.
283
284 ``Plugin`` exports a field, ``installCoreToDos`` which is a function of
285 type ``[CommandLineOption] -> [CoreToDo] -> CoreM [CoreToDo]``. A
286 ``CommandLineOption`` is effectively just ``String``, and a ``CoreToDo``
287 is basically a function of type ``Core -> Core``. A ``CoreToDo`` gives
288 your pass a name and runs it over every compiled module when you invoke
289 GHC.
290
291 As a quick example, here is a simple plugin that just does nothing and
292 just returns the original compilation pipeline, unmodified, and says
293 'Hello':
294
295 ::
296
297     module DoNothing.Plugin (plugin) where
298     import GhcPlugins
299
300     plugin :: Plugin
301     plugin = defaultPlugin {
302       installCoreToDos = install
303       }
304
305     install :: [CommandLineOption] -> [CoreToDo] -> CoreM [CoreToDo]
306     install _ todo = do
307       putMsgS "Hello!"
308       return todo
309
310 Provided you compiled this plugin and registered it in a package (with
311 cabal for instance,) you can then use it by just specifying
312 ``-fplugin=DoNothing.Plugin`` on the command line, and during the
313 compilation you should see GHC say 'Hello'.
314
315 .. _core-plugins-in-more-detail:
316
317 Core plugins in more detail
318 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
319
320 ``CoreToDo`` is effectively a data type that describes all the kinds of
321 optimization passes GHC does on Core. There are passes for
322 simplification, CSE, vectorisation, etc. There is a specific case for
323 plugins, ``CoreDoPluginPass :: String -> PluginPass -> CoreToDo`` which
324 should be what you always use when inserting your own pass into the
325 pipeline. The first parameter is the name of the plugin, and the second
326 is the pass you wish to insert.
327
328 ``CoreM`` is a monad that all of the Core optimizations live and operate
329 inside of.
330
331 A plugin's installation function (``install`` in the above example)
332 takes a list of ``CoreToDo``\ s and returns a list of ``CoreToDo``.
333 Before GHC begins compiling modules, it enumerates all the needed
334 plugins you tell it to load, and runs all of their installation
335 functions, initially on a list of passes that GHC specifies itself.
336 After doing this for every plugin, the final list of passes is given to
337 the optimizer, and are run by simply going over the list in order.
338
339 You should be careful with your installation function, because the list
340 of passes you give back isn't questioned or double checked by GHC at the
341 time of this writing. An installation function like the following:
342
343 ::
344
345     install :: [CommandLineOption] -> [CoreToDo] -> CoreM [CoreToDo]
346     install _ _ = return []
347
348 is certainly valid, but also certainly not what anyone really wants.
349
350 .. _manipulating-bindings:
351
352 Manipulating bindings
353 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
354
355 In the last section we saw that besides a name, a ``CoreDoPluginPass``
356 takes a pass of type ``PluginPass``. A ``PluginPass`` is a synonym for
357 ``(ModGuts -> CoreM ModGuts)``. ``ModGuts`` is a type that represents
358 the one module being compiled by GHC at any given time.
359
360 A ``ModGuts`` holds all of the module's top level bindings which we can
361 examine. These bindings are of type ``CoreBind`` and effectively
362 represent the binding of a name to body of code. Top-level module
363 bindings are part of a ``ModGuts`` in the field ``mg_binds``.
364 Implementing a pass that manipulates the top level bindings merely needs
365 to iterate over this field, and return a new ``ModGuts`` with an updated
366 ``mg_binds`` field. Because this is such a common case, there is a
367 function provided named ``bindsOnlyPass`` which lifts a function of type
368 ``([CoreBind] -> CoreM [CoreBind])`` to type
369 ``(ModGuts -> CoreM ModGuts)``.
370
371 Continuing with our example from the last section, we can write a simple
372 plugin that just prints out the name of all the non-recursive bindings
373 in a module it compiles:
374
375 ::
376
377     module SayNames.Plugin (plugin) where
378     import GhcPlugins
379
380     plugin :: Plugin
381     plugin = defaultPlugin {
382       installCoreToDos = install
383       }
384
385     install :: [CommandLineOption] -> [CoreToDo] -> CoreM [CoreToDo]
386     install _ todo = do
387       return (CoreDoPluginPass "Say name" pass : todo)
388
389     pass :: ModGuts -> CoreM ModGuts
390     pass guts = do dflags <- getDynFlags
391                    bindsOnlyPass (mapM (printBind dflags)) guts
392       where printBind :: DynFlags -> CoreBind -> CoreM CoreBind
393             printBind dflags bndr@(NonRec b _) = do
394               putMsgS $ "Non-recursive binding named " ++ showSDoc dflags (ppr b)
395               return bndr 
396             printBind _ bndr = return bndr
397
398 .. _getting-annotations:
399
400 Using Annotations
401 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
402
403 Previously we discussed annotation pragmas (:ref:`annotation-pragmas`),
404 which we mentioned could be used to give compiler plugins extra guidance
405 or information. Annotations for a module can be retrieved by a plugin,
406 but you must go through the modules ``ModGuts`` in order to get it.
407 Because annotations can be arbitrary instances of ``Data`` and
408 ``Typeable``, you need to give a type annotation specifying the proper
409 type of data to retrieve from the interface file, and you need to make
410 sure the annotation type used by your users is the same one your plugin
411 uses. For this reason, we advise distributing annotations as part of the
412 package which also provides compiler plugins if possible.
413
414 To get the annotations of a single binder, you can use
415 ``getAnnotations`` and specify the proper type. Here's an example that
416 will print out the name of any top-level non-recursive binding with the
417 ``SomeAnn`` annotation:
418
419 ::
420
421     {-# LANGUAGE DeriveDataTypeable #-}
422     module SayAnnNames.Plugin (plugin, SomeAnn(..)) where
423     import GhcPlugins
424     import Control.Monad (unless)
425     import Data.Data
426
427     data SomeAnn = SomeAnn deriving Data
428
429     plugin :: Plugin
430     plugin = defaultPlugin {
431       installCoreToDos = install
432       }
433
434     install :: [CommandLineOption] -> [CoreToDo] -> CoreM [CoreToDo]
435     install _ todo = do
436       return (CoreDoPluginPass "Say name" pass : todo)
437
438     pass :: ModGuts -> CoreM ModGuts
439     pass g = do
440               dflags <- getDynFlags
441               mapM_ (printAnn dflags g) (mg_binds g) >> return g
442       where printAnn :: DynFlags -> ModGuts -> CoreBind -> CoreM CoreBind
443             printAnn dflags guts bndr@(NonRec b _) = do
444               anns <- annotationsOn guts b :: CoreM [SomeAnn]
445               unless (null anns) $ putMsgS $ "Annotated binding found: " ++  showSDoc dflags (ppr b)
446               return bndr
447             printAnn _ _ bndr = return bndr
448
449     annotationsOn :: Data a => ModGuts -> CoreBndr -> CoreM [a]
450     annotationsOn guts bndr = do
451       anns <- getAnnotations deserializeWithData guts
452       return $ lookupWithDefaultUFM anns [] (varUnique bndr)
453
454 Please see the GHC API documentation for more about how to use internal
455 APIs, etc.
456
457 .. _typechecker-plugins:
458
459 Typechecker plugins
460 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
461
462 In addition to Core plugins, GHC has experimental support for
463 typechecker plugins, which allow the behaviour of the constraint solver
464 to be modified. For example, they make it possible to interface the
465 compiler to an SMT solver, in order to support a richer theory of
466 type-level arithmetic expressions than the theory built into GHC (see
467 :ref:`typelit-tyfuns`).
468
469 The ``Plugin`` type has a field ``tcPlugin`` of type
470 ``[CommandLineOption] -> Maybe TcPlugin``, where the ``TcPlugin`` type
471 is defined thus:
472
473 ::
474
475     data TcPlugin = forall s . TcPlugin
476       { tcPluginInit  :: TcPluginM s
477       , tcPluginSolve :: s -> TcPluginSolver
478       , tcPluginStop  :: s -> TcPluginM ()
479       }
480
481     type TcPluginSolver = [Ct] -> [Ct] -> [Ct] -> TcPluginM TcPluginResult
482
483     data TcPluginResult = TcPluginContradiction [Ct] | TcPluginOk [(EvTerm,Ct)] [Ct]
484
485 (The details of this representation are subject to change as we gain
486 more experience writing typechecker plugins. It should not be assumed to
487 be stable between GHC releases.)
488
489 The basic idea is as follows:
490
491 -  When type checking a module, GHC calls ``tcPluginInit`` once before
492    constraint solving starts. This allows the plugin to look things up
493    in the context, initialise mutable state or open a connection to an
494    external process (e.g. an external SMT solver). The plugin can return
495    a result of any type it likes, and the result will be passed to the
496    other two fields.
497
498 -  During constraint solving, GHC repeatedly calls ``tcPluginSolve``.
499    This function is provided with the current set of constraints, and
500    should return a ``TcPluginResult`` that indicates whether a
501    contradiction was found or progress was made. If the plugin solver
502    makes progress, GHC will re-start the constraint solving pipeline,
503    looping until a fixed point is reached.
504
505 -  Finally, GHC calls ``tcPluginStop`` after constraint solving is
506    finished, allowing the plugin to dispose of any resources it has
507    allocated (e.g. terminating the SMT solver process).
508
509 Plugin code runs in the ``TcPluginM`` monad, which provides a restricted
510 interface to GHC API functionality that is relevant for typechecker
511 plugins, including ``IO`` and reading the environment. If you need
512 functionality that is not exposed in the ``TcPluginM`` module, you can
513 use ``unsafeTcPluginTcM :: TcM a -> TcPluginM a``, but are encouraged to
514 contact the GHC team to suggest additions to the interface. Note that
515 ``TcPluginM`` can perform arbitrary IO via
516 ``tcPluginIO :: IO a -> TcPluginM a``, although some care must be taken
517 with side effects (particularly in ``tcPluginSolve``). In general, it is
518 up to the plugin author to make sure that any IO they do is safe.
519
520 .. _constraint-solving-with-plugins:
521
522 Constraint solving with plugins
523 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
524
525 The key component of a typechecker plugin is a function of type
526 ``TcPluginSolver``, like this:
527
528 ::
529
530     solve :: [Ct] -> [Ct] -> [Ct] -> TcPluginM TcPluginResult
531     solve givens deriveds wanteds = ...
532
533 This function will be invoked at two points in the constraint solving
534 process: after simplification of given constraints, and after
535 unflattening of wanted constraints. The two phases can be distinguished
536 because the deriveds and wanteds will be empty in the first case. In
537 each case, the plugin should either
538
539 -  return ``TcPluginContradiction`` with a list of impossible
540    constraints (which must be a subset of those passed in), so they can
541    be turned into errors; or
542
543 -  return ``TcPluginOk`` with lists of solved and new constraints (the
544    former must be a subset of those passed in and must be supplied with
545    corresponding evidence terms).
546
547 If the plugin cannot make any progress, it should return
548 ``TcPluginOk [] []``. Otherwise, if there were any new constraints, the
549 main constraint solver will be re-invoked to simplify them, then the
550 plugin will be invoked again. The plugin is responsible for making sure
551 that this process eventually terminates.
552
553 Plugins are provided with all available constraints (including
554 equalities and typeclass constraints), but it is easy for them to
555 discard those that are not relevant to their domain, because they need
556 return only those constraints for which they have made progress (either
557 by solving or contradicting them).
558
559 Constraints that have been solved by the plugin must be provided with
560 evidence in the form of an ``EvTerm`` of the type of the constraint.
561 This evidence is ignored for given and derived constraints, which GHC
562 "solves" simply by discarding them; typically this is used when they are
563 uninformative (e.g. reflexive equations). For wanted constraints, the
564 evidence will form part of the Core term that is generated after
565 typechecking, and can be checked by ``-dcore-lint``. It is possible for
566 the plugin to create equality axioms for use in evidence terms, but GHC
567 does not check their consistency, and inconsistent axiom sets may lead
568 to segfaults or other runtime misbehaviour.
569
570 .. _frontend_plugins:
571
572 Frontend plugins
573 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
574
575 A frontend plugin allows you to add new major modes to GHC.  You may prefer
576 this over a traditional program which calls the GHC API, as GHC manages a lot
577 of parsing flags and administrative nonsense which can be difficult to
578 manage manually.  To load a frontend plugin exported by ``Foo.FrontendPlugin``,
579 we just invoke GHC with the :ghc-flag:`--frontend ⟨module⟩` flag as follows:
580
581 .. code-block:: none
582
583     $ ghc --frontend Foo.FrontendPlugin ...other options...
584
585 Frontend plugins, like compiler plugins, are exported by registered plugins.
586 However, unlike compiler modules, frontend plugins are modules that export
587 at least a single identifier ``frontendPlugin`` of type
588 ``GhcPlugins.FrontendPlugin``.
589
590 ``FrontendPlugin`` exports a field ``frontend``, which is a function
591 ``[String] -> [(String, Maybe Phase)] -> Ghc ()``.  The first argument
592 is a list of extra flags passed to the frontend with ``-ffrontend-opt``;
593 the second argument is the list of arguments, usually source files
594 and module names to be compiled (the ``Phase`` indicates if an ``-x``
595 flag was set), and a frontend simply executes some operation in the
596 ``Ghc`` monad (which, among other things, has a ``Session``).
597
598 As a quick example, here is a frontend plugin that prints the arguments that
599 were passed to it, and then exits.
600
601 ::
602
603     module DoNothing.FrontendPlugin (frontendPlugin) where
604     import GhcPlugins
605
606     frontendPlugin :: FrontendPlugin
607     frontendPlugin = defaultFrontendPlugin {
608       frontend = doNothing
609       }
610
611     doNothing :: [String] -> [(String, Maybe Phase)] -> Ghc ()
612     doNothing flags args = do
613         liftIO $ print flags
614         liftIO $ print args
615
616 Provided you have compiled this plugin and registered it in a package,
617 you can just use it by specifying ``--frontend DoNothing.FrontendPlugin``
618 on the command line to GHC.