Spelling fix bgamari-patch-1
authorBen Gamari <ben@smart-cactus.org>
Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:39:10 +0000 (17:39 -0500)
committerGitHub <noreply@github.com>
Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:39:10 +0000 (17:39 -0500)
README.md

index 6c3ca0c..f059998 100644 (file)
--- a/README.md
+++ b/README.md
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ All three modules provide the same API, and the same documentation (calling out
 
 The answer for this library is "no". While an abstract `FilePath` has some advantages (mostly type safety), it also has some disadvantages:
 
-* In Haskell the definition is `type FilePath = String`, and all file-orientated functions operate on this type alias, e.g. `readFile`/`writeFile`. Any abstract type would require wrappers for these functions or lots of casts between `String` and the abstraction.
+* In Haskell the definition is `type FilePath = String`, and all file-oriented functions operate on this type alias, e.g. `readFile`/`writeFile`. Any abstract type would require wrappers for these functions or lots of casts between `String` and the abstraction.
 * It is not immediately obvious what a `FilePath` is, and what is just a pure `String`. For example, `/path/file.ext` is a `FilePath`. Is `/`? `/path`? `path`? `file.ext`? `.ext`? `file`?
 * Often it is useful to represent invalid files, e.g. `/foo/*.txt` probably isn't an actual file, but a glob pattern. Other programs use `foo//bar` for globs, which is definitely not a file, but might want to be stored as a `FilePath`.
 * Some programs use syntactic non-semantic details of the `FilePath` to change their behaviour. For example, `foo`, `foo/` and `foo/.` are all similar, and refer to the same location on disk, but may behave differently when passed to command-line tools.