Set up framework for generalising Data.List to Foldables
authorHerbert Valerio Riedel <hvr@gnu.org>
Sat, 20 Sep 2014 21:32:06 +0000 (23:32 +0200)
committerHerbert Valerio Riedel <hvr@gnu.org>
Sat, 20 Sep 2014 21:38:30 +0000 (23:38 +0200)
This renames the Data.List module to Data.OldList, and puts a new
Data.List module into its place re-exporting all list functions.

The plan is to leave the monomorphic versions of the list functions in
Data.OldList to help smooth the transition.

The new Data.List module then will simply re-export entities from
Data.OldList and Data.Foldable.

This refactoring has been placed in a separate commit to be able to
better isolate any regressions caused by the actual list function
generalisations when implementing #9586

This also updates the haskell2010, haskell98, and array submodules

Reviewed By: austin, ekmett

Differential Revision: https://phabricator.haskell.org/D228

16 files changed:
libraries/array
libraries/base/Data/Foldable.hs
libraries/base/Data/List.hs
libraries/base/Data/OldList.hs [new file with mode: 0644]
libraries/base/Data/OldTypeable/Internal.hs
libraries/base/GHC/Event/Internal.hs
libraries/base/GHC/Exts.hs
libraries/base/Prelude.hs
libraries/base/base.cabal
libraries/haskell2010
libraries/haskell98
testsuite/tests/ghci/scripts/ghci008.stdout
testsuite/tests/lib/integer/integerGmpInternals.hs
testsuite/tests/rename/should_compile/T1972.stderr
testsuite/tests/rename/should_compile/T7963a.hs
testsuite/tests/rename/should_fail/rnfail040.stderr

index bfb4885..f795552 160000 (submodule)
@@ -1 +1 @@
-Subproject commit bfb488592cf5c92a6970eff64b9495970464014b
+Subproject commit f7955522c45a6b7da352349381d93be7c38dff35
index b839106..cb13e5c 100644 (file)
@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ module Data.Foldable (
 import Data.Bool
 import Data.Either
 import Data.Eq
-import qualified Data.List as List
+import qualified Data.OldList as List
 import Data.Maybe
 import Data.Monoid
 import Data.Ord
index 5e5acc1..44c86bb 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
+{-# LANGUAGE NoImplicitPrelude #-}
 {-# LANGUAGE Trustworthy #-}
-{-# LANGUAGE CPP, NoImplicitPrelude, ScopedTypeVariables, MagicHash #-}
 
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 -- |
@@ -207,909 +207,5 @@ module Data.List
 
    ) where
 
-import Data.Maybe
-import Data.Char        ( isSpace )
-import Data.Ord         ( comparing )
-import Data.Tuple       ( fst, snd )
-
-import GHC.Num
-import GHC.Real
-import GHC.List
-import GHC.Base
-
-infix 5 \\ -- comment to fool cpp: https://www.haskell.org/ghc/docs/latest/html/users_guide/options-phases.html#cpp-string-gaps
-
--- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--- List functions
-
--- | The 'dropWhileEnd' function drops the largest suffix of a list
--- in which the given predicate holds for all elements.  For example:
---
--- > dropWhileEnd isSpace "foo\n" == "foo"
--- > dropWhileEnd isSpace "foo bar" == "foo bar"
--- > dropWhileEnd isSpace ("foo\n" ++ undefined) == "foo" ++ undefined
---
--- /Since: 4.5.0.0/
-dropWhileEnd :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
-dropWhileEnd p = foldr (\x xs -> if p x && null xs then [] else x : xs) []
-
--- | The 'stripPrefix' function drops the given prefix from a list.
--- It returns 'Nothing' if the list did not start with the prefix
--- given, or 'Just' the list after the prefix, if it does.
---
--- > stripPrefix "foo" "foobar" == Just "bar"
--- > stripPrefix "foo" "foo" == Just ""
--- > stripPrefix "foo" "barfoo" == Nothing
--- > stripPrefix "foo" "barfoobaz" == Nothing
-stripPrefix :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> Maybe [a]
-stripPrefix [] ys = Just ys
-stripPrefix (x:xs) (y:ys)
- | x == y = stripPrefix xs ys
-stripPrefix _ _ = Nothing
-
--- | The 'elemIndex' function returns the index of the first element
--- in the given list which is equal (by '==') to the query element,
--- or 'Nothing' if there is no such element.
-elemIndex       :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> Maybe Int
-elemIndex x     = findIndex (x==)
-
--- | The 'elemIndices' function extends 'elemIndex', by returning the
--- indices of all elements equal to the query element, in ascending order.
-elemIndices     :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> [Int]
-elemIndices x   = findIndices (x==)
-
--- | The 'find' function takes a predicate and a list and returns the
--- first element in the list matching the predicate, or 'Nothing' if
--- there is no such element.
-find            :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> Maybe a
-find p          = listToMaybe . filter p
-
--- | The 'findIndex' function takes a predicate and a list and returns
--- the index of the first element in the list satisfying the predicate,
--- or 'Nothing' if there is no such element.
-findIndex       :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> Maybe Int
-findIndex p     = listToMaybe . findIndices p
-
--- | The 'findIndices' function extends 'findIndex', by returning the
--- indices of all elements satisfying the predicate, in ascending order.
-findIndices      :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [Int]
-#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
-findIndices p xs = [ i | (x,i) <- zip xs [0..], p x]
-#else
--- Efficient definition
-findIndices p ls = loop 0# ls
-                 where
-                   loop _ [] = []
-                   loop n (x:xs) | p x       = I# n : loop (n +# 1#) xs
-                                 | otherwise = loop (n +# 1#) xs
-#endif  /* USE_REPORT_PRELUDE */
-
--- | The 'isPrefixOf' function takes two lists and returns 'True'
--- iff the first list is a prefix of the second.
-isPrefixOf              :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
-isPrefixOf [] _         =  True
-isPrefixOf _  []        =  False
-isPrefixOf (x:xs) (y:ys)=  x == y && isPrefixOf xs ys
-
--- | The 'isSuffixOf' function takes two lists and returns 'True'
--- iff the first list is a suffix of the second.
--- Both lists must be finite.
-isSuffixOf              :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
-isSuffixOf x y          =  reverse x `isPrefixOf` reverse y
-
--- | The 'isInfixOf' function takes two lists and returns 'True'
--- iff the first list is contained, wholly and intact,
--- anywhere within the second.
---
--- Example:
---
--- >isInfixOf "Haskell" "I really like Haskell." == True
--- >isInfixOf "Ial" "I really like Haskell." == False
-isInfixOf               :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
-isInfixOf needle haystack = any (isPrefixOf needle) (tails haystack)
-
--- | /O(n^2)/. The 'nub' function removes duplicate elements from a list.
--- In particular, it keeps only the first occurrence of each element.
--- (The name 'nub' means \`essence\'.)
--- It is a special case of 'nubBy', which allows the programmer to supply
--- their own equality test.
-nub                     :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a]
-#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
-nub                     =  nubBy (==)
-#else
--- stolen from HBC
-nub l                   = nub' l []             -- '
-  where
-    nub' [] _           = []                    -- '
-    nub' (x:xs) ls                              -- '
-        | x `elem` ls   = nub' xs ls            -- '
-        | otherwise     = x : nub' xs (x:ls)    -- '
-#endif
-
--- | The 'nubBy' function behaves just like 'nub', except it uses a
--- user-supplied equality predicate instead of the overloaded '=='
--- function.
-nubBy                   :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
-#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
-nubBy eq []             =  []
-nubBy eq (x:xs)         =  x : nubBy eq (filter (\ y -> not (eq x y)) xs)
-#else
-nubBy eq l              = nubBy' l []
-  where
-    nubBy' [] _         = []
-    nubBy' (y:ys) xs
-       | elem_by eq y xs = nubBy' ys xs
-       | otherwise       = y : nubBy' ys (y:xs)
-
--- Not exported:
--- Note that we keep the call to `eq` with arguments in the
--- same order as in the reference implementation
--- 'xs' is the list of things we've seen so far,
--- 'y' is the potential new element
-elem_by :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> a -> [a] -> Bool
-elem_by _  _ []         =  False
-elem_by eq y (x:xs)     =  y `eq` x || elem_by eq y xs
-#endif
-
-
--- | 'delete' @x@ removes the first occurrence of @x@ from its list argument.
--- For example,
---
--- > delete 'a' "banana" == "bnana"
---
--- It is a special case of 'deleteBy', which allows the programmer to
--- supply their own equality test.
-
-delete                  :: (Eq a) => a -> [a] -> [a]
-delete                  =  deleteBy (==)
-
--- | The 'deleteBy' function behaves like 'delete', but takes a
--- user-supplied equality predicate.
-deleteBy                :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> a -> [a] -> [a]
-deleteBy _  _ []        = []
-deleteBy eq x (y:ys)    = if x `eq` y then ys else y : deleteBy eq x ys
-
--- | The '\\' function is list difference (non-associative).
--- In the result of @xs@ '\\' @ys@, the first occurrence of each element of
--- @ys@ in turn (if any) has been removed from @xs@.  Thus
---
--- > (xs ++ ys) \\ xs == ys.
---
--- It is a special case of 'deleteFirstsBy', which allows the programmer
--- to supply their own equality test.
-
-(\\)                    :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-(\\)                    =  foldl (flip delete)
-
--- | The 'union' function returns the list union of the two lists.
--- For example,
---
--- > "dog" `union` "cow" == "dogcw"
---
--- Duplicates, and elements of the first list, are removed from the
--- the second list, but if the first list contains duplicates, so will
--- the result.
--- It is a special case of 'unionBy', which allows the programmer to supply
--- their own equality test.
-
-union                   :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-union                   = unionBy (==)
-
--- | The 'unionBy' function is the non-overloaded version of 'union'.
-unionBy                 :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-unionBy eq xs ys        =  xs ++ foldl (flip (deleteBy eq)) (nubBy eq ys) xs
-
--- | The 'intersect' function takes the list intersection of two lists.
--- For example,
---
--- > [1,2,3,4] `intersect` [2,4,6,8] == [2,4]
---
--- If the first list contains duplicates, so will the result.
---
--- > [1,2,2,3,4] `intersect` [6,4,4,2] == [2,2,4]
---
--- It is a special case of 'intersectBy', which allows the programmer to
--- supply their own equality test. If the element is found in both the first
--- and the second list, the element from the first list will be used.
-
-intersect               :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-intersect               =  intersectBy (==)
-
--- | The 'intersectBy' function is the non-overloaded version of 'intersect'.
-intersectBy             :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-intersectBy _  [] _     =  []
-intersectBy _  _  []    =  []
-intersectBy eq xs ys    =  [x | x <- xs, any (eq x) ys]
-
--- | The 'intersperse' function takes an element and a list and
--- \`intersperses\' that element between the elements of the list.
--- For example,
---
--- > intersperse ',' "abcde" == "a,b,c,d,e"
-
-intersperse             :: a -> [a] -> [a]
-intersperse _   []      = []
-intersperse sep (x:xs)  = x : prependToAll sep xs
-
-
--- Not exported:
--- We want to make every element in the 'intersperse'd list available
--- as soon as possible to avoid space leaks. Experiments suggested that
--- a separate top-level helper is more efficient than a local worker.
-prependToAll            :: a -> [a] -> [a]
-prependToAll _   []     = []
-prependToAll sep (x:xs) = sep : x : prependToAll sep xs
-
--- | 'intercalate' @xs xss@ is equivalent to @('concat' ('intersperse' xs xss))@.
--- It inserts the list @xs@ in between the lists in @xss@ and concatenates the
--- result.
-intercalate :: [a] -> [[a]] -> [a]
-intercalate xs xss = concat (intersperse xs xss)
-
--- | The 'transpose' function transposes the rows and columns of its argument.
--- For example,
---
--- > transpose [[1,2,3],[4,5,6]] == [[1,4],[2,5],[3,6]]
-
-transpose               :: [[a]] -> [[a]]
-transpose []             = []
-transpose ([]   : xss)   = transpose xss
-transpose ((x:xs) : xss) = (x : [h | (h:_) <- xss]) : transpose (xs : [ t | (_:t) <- xss])
-
-
--- | The 'partition' function takes a predicate a list and returns
--- the pair of lists of elements which do and do not satisfy the
--- predicate, respectively; i.e.,
---
--- > partition p xs == (filter p xs, filter (not . p) xs)
-
-partition               :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> ([a],[a])
-{-# INLINE partition #-}
-partition p xs = foldr (select p) ([],[]) xs
-
-select :: (a -> Bool) -> a -> ([a], [a]) -> ([a], [a])
-select p x ~(ts,fs) | p x       = (x:ts,fs)
-                    | otherwise = (ts, x:fs)
-
--- | The 'mapAccumL' function behaves like a combination of 'map' and
--- 'foldl'; it applies a function to each element of a list, passing
--- an accumulating parameter from left to right, and returning a final
--- value of this accumulator together with the new list.
-mapAccumL :: (acc -> x -> (acc, y)) -- Function of elt of input list
-                                    -- and accumulator, returning new
-                                    -- accumulator and elt of result list
-          -> acc            -- Initial accumulator
-          -> [x]            -- Input list
-          -> (acc, [y])     -- Final accumulator and result list
-mapAccumL _ s []        =  (s, [])
-mapAccumL f s (x:xs)    =  (s'',y:ys)
-                           where (s', y ) = f s x
-                                 (s'',ys) = mapAccumL f s' xs
-
--- | The 'mapAccumR' function behaves like a combination of 'map' and
--- 'foldr'; it applies a function to each element of a list, passing
--- an accumulating parameter from right to left, and returning a final
--- value of this accumulator together with the new list.
-mapAccumR :: (acc -> x -> (acc, y))     -- Function of elt of input list
-                                        -- and accumulator, returning new
-                                        -- accumulator and elt of result list
-            -> acc              -- Initial accumulator
-            -> [x]              -- Input list
-            -> (acc, [y])               -- Final accumulator and result list
-mapAccumR _ s []        =  (s, [])
-mapAccumR f s (x:xs)    =  (s'', y:ys)
-                           where (s'',y ) = f s' x
-                                 (s', ys) = mapAccumR f s xs
-
--- | The 'insert' function takes an element and a list and inserts the
--- element into the list at the first position where it is less
--- than or equal to the next element.  In particular, if the list
--- is sorted before the call, the result will also be sorted.
--- It is a special case of 'insertBy', which allows the programmer to
--- supply their own comparison function.
-insert :: Ord a => a -> [a] -> [a]
-insert e ls = insertBy (compare) e ls
-
--- | The non-overloaded version of 'insert'.
-insertBy :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> a -> [a] -> [a]
-insertBy _   x [] = [x]
-insertBy cmp x ys@(y:ys')
- = case cmp x y of
-     GT -> y : insertBy cmp x ys'
-     _  -> x : ys
-
--- | 'maximum' returns the maximum value from a list,
--- which must be non-empty, finite, and of an ordered type.
--- It is a special case of 'Data.List.maximumBy', which allows the
--- programmer to supply their own comparison function.
-maximum                 :: (Ord a) => [a] -> a
-{-# INLINE [1] maximum #-}
-maximum []              =  errorEmptyList "maximum"
-maximum xs              =  foldl1 max xs
-
-{-# RULES
-  "maximumInt"     maximum = (strictMaximum :: [Int]     -> Int);
-  "maximumInteger" maximum = (strictMaximum :: [Integer] -> Integer)
- #-}
-
--- We can't make the overloaded version of maximum strict without
--- changing its semantics (max might not be strict), but we can for
--- the version specialised to 'Int'.
-strictMaximum           :: (Ord a) => [a] -> a
-strictMaximum []        =  errorEmptyList "maximum"
-strictMaximum xs        =  foldl1' max xs
-
--- | 'minimum' returns the minimum value from a list,
--- which must be non-empty, finite, and of an ordered type.
--- It is a special case of 'Data.List.minimumBy', which allows the
--- programmer to supply their own comparison function.
-minimum                 :: (Ord a) => [a] -> a
-{-# INLINE [1] minimum #-}
-minimum []              =  errorEmptyList "minimum"
-minimum xs              =  foldl1 min xs
-
-{-# RULES
-  "minimumInt"     minimum = (strictMinimum :: [Int]     -> Int);
-  "minimumInteger" minimum = (strictMinimum :: [Integer] -> Integer)
- #-}
-
-strictMinimum           :: (Ord a) => [a] -> a
-strictMinimum []        =  errorEmptyList "minimum"
-strictMinimum xs        =  foldl1' min xs
-
--- | The 'maximumBy' function takes a comparison function and a list
--- and returns the greatest element of the list by the comparison function.
--- The list must be finite and non-empty.
-maximumBy               :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> a
-maximumBy _ []          =  error "List.maximumBy: empty list"
-maximumBy cmp xs        =  foldl1 maxBy xs
-                        where
-                           maxBy x y = case cmp x y of
-                                       GT -> x
-                                       _  -> y
-
--- | The 'minimumBy' function takes a comparison function and a list
--- and returns the least element of the list by the comparison function.
--- The list must be finite and non-empty.
-minimumBy               :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> a
-minimumBy _ []          =  error "List.minimumBy: empty list"
-minimumBy cmp xs        =  foldl1 minBy xs
-                        where
-                           minBy x y = case cmp x y of
-                                       GT -> y
-                                       _  -> x
-
--- | The 'genericLength' function is an overloaded version of 'length'.  In
--- particular, instead of returning an 'Int', it returns any type which is
--- an instance of 'Num'.  It is, however, less efficient than 'length'.
-genericLength           :: (Num i) => [a] -> i
-{-# NOINLINE [1] genericLength #-}
-genericLength []        =  0
-genericLength (_:l)     =  1 + genericLength l
-
-{-# RULES
-  "genericLengthInt"     genericLength = (strictGenericLength :: [a] -> Int);
-  "genericLengthInteger" genericLength = (strictGenericLength :: [a] -> Integer);
- #-}
-
-strictGenericLength     :: (Num i) => [b] -> i
-strictGenericLength l   =  gl l 0
-                        where
-                           gl [] a     = a
-                           gl (_:xs) a = let a' = a + 1 in a' `seq` gl xs a'
-
--- | The 'genericTake' function is an overloaded version of 'take', which
--- accepts any 'Integral' value as the number of elements to take.
-genericTake             :: (Integral i) => i -> [a] -> [a]
-genericTake n _ | n <= 0 = []
-genericTake _ []        =  []
-genericTake n (x:xs)    =  x : genericTake (n-1) xs
-
--- | The 'genericDrop' function is an overloaded version of 'drop', which
--- accepts any 'Integral' value as the number of elements to drop.
-genericDrop             :: (Integral i) => i -> [a] -> [a]
-genericDrop n xs | n <= 0 = xs
-genericDrop _ []        =  []
-genericDrop n (_:xs)    =  genericDrop (n-1) xs
-
-
--- | The 'genericSplitAt' function is an overloaded version of 'splitAt', which
--- accepts any 'Integral' value as the position at which to split.
-genericSplitAt          :: (Integral i) => i -> [a] -> ([a], [a])
-genericSplitAt n xs | n <= 0 =  ([],xs)
-genericSplitAt _ []     =  ([],[])
-genericSplitAt n (x:xs) =  (x:xs',xs'') where
-    (xs',xs'') = genericSplitAt (n-1) xs
-
--- | The 'genericIndex' function is an overloaded version of '!!', which
--- accepts any 'Integral' value as the index.
-genericIndex :: (Integral i) => [a] -> i -> a
-genericIndex (x:_)  0 = x
-genericIndex (_:xs) n
- | n > 0     = genericIndex xs (n-1)
- | otherwise = error "List.genericIndex: negative argument."
-genericIndex _ _      = error "List.genericIndex: index too large."
-
--- | The 'genericReplicate' function is an overloaded version of 'replicate',
--- which accepts any 'Integral' value as the number of repetitions to make.
-genericReplicate        :: (Integral i) => i -> a -> [a]
-genericReplicate n x    =  genericTake n (repeat x)
-
--- | The 'zip4' function takes four lists and returns a list of
--- quadruples, analogous to 'zip'.
-zip4                    :: [a] -> [b] -> [c] -> [d] -> [(a,b,c,d)]
-zip4                    =  zipWith4 (,,,)
-
--- | The 'zip5' function takes five lists and returns a list of
--- five-tuples, analogous to 'zip'.
-zip5                    :: [a] -> [b] -> [c] -> [d] -> [e] -> [(a,b,c,d,e)]
-zip5                    =  zipWith5 (,,,,)
-
--- | The 'zip6' function takes six lists and returns a list of six-tuples,
--- analogous to 'zip'.
-zip6                    :: [a] -> [b] -> [c] -> [d] -> [e] -> [f] ->
-                              [(a,b,c,d,e,f)]
-zip6                    =  zipWith6 (,,,,,)
-
--- | The 'zip7' function takes seven lists and returns a list of
--- seven-tuples, analogous to 'zip'.
-zip7                    :: [a] -> [b] -> [c] -> [d] -> [e] -> [f] ->
-                              [g] -> [(a,b,c,d,e,f,g)]
-zip7                    =  zipWith7 (,,,,,,)
-
--- | The 'zipWith4' function takes a function which combines four
--- elements, as well as four lists and returns a list of their point-wise
--- combination, analogous to 'zipWith'.
-zipWith4                :: (a->b->c->d->e) -> [a]->[b]->[c]->[d]->[e]
-zipWith4 z (a:as) (b:bs) (c:cs) (d:ds)
-                        =  z a b c d : zipWith4 z as bs cs ds
-zipWith4 _ _ _ _ _      =  []
-
--- | The 'zipWith5' function takes a function which combines five
--- elements, as well as five lists and returns a list of their point-wise
--- combination, analogous to 'zipWith'.
-zipWith5                :: (a->b->c->d->e->f) ->
-                           [a]->[b]->[c]->[d]->[e]->[f]
-zipWith5 z (a:as) (b:bs) (c:cs) (d:ds) (e:es)
-                        =  z a b c d e : zipWith5 z as bs cs ds es
-zipWith5 _ _ _ _ _ _    = []
-
--- | The 'zipWith6' function takes a function which combines six
--- elements, as well as six lists and returns a list of their point-wise
--- combination, analogous to 'zipWith'.
-zipWith6                :: (a->b->c->d->e->f->g) ->
-                           [a]->[b]->[c]->[d]->[e]->[f]->[g]
-zipWith6 z (a:as) (b:bs) (c:cs) (d:ds) (e:es) (f:fs)
-                        =  z a b c d e f : zipWith6 z as bs cs ds es fs
-zipWith6 _ _ _ _ _ _ _  = []
-
--- | The 'zipWith7' function takes a function which combines seven
--- elements, as well as seven lists and returns a list of their point-wise
--- combination, analogous to 'zipWith'.
-zipWith7                :: (a->b->c->d->e->f->g->h) ->
-                           [a]->[b]->[c]->[d]->[e]->[f]->[g]->[h]
-zipWith7 z (a:as) (b:bs) (c:cs) (d:ds) (e:es) (f:fs) (g:gs)
-                   =  z a b c d e f g : zipWith7 z as bs cs ds es fs gs
-zipWith7 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ = []
-
--- | The 'unzip4' function takes a list of quadruples and returns four
--- lists, analogous to 'unzip'.
-unzip4                  :: [(a,b,c,d)] -> ([a],[b],[c],[d])
-unzip4                  =  foldr (\(a,b,c,d) ~(as,bs,cs,ds) ->
-                                        (a:as,b:bs,c:cs,d:ds))
-                                 ([],[],[],[])
-
--- | The 'unzip5' function takes a list of five-tuples and returns five
--- lists, analogous to 'unzip'.
-unzip5                  :: [(a,b,c,d,e)] -> ([a],[b],[c],[d],[e])
-unzip5                  =  foldr (\(a,b,c,d,e) ~(as,bs,cs,ds,es) ->
-                                        (a:as,b:bs,c:cs,d:ds,e:es))
-                                 ([],[],[],[],[])
-
--- | The 'unzip6' function takes a list of six-tuples and returns six
--- lists, analogous to 'unzip'.
-unzip6                  :: [(a,b,c,d,e,f)] -> ([a],[b],[c],[d],[e],[f])
-unzip6                  =  foldr (\(a,b,c,d,e,f) ~(as,bs,cs,ds,es,fs) ->
-                                        (a:as,b:bs,c:cs,d:ds,e:es,f:fs))
-                                 ([],[],[],[],[],[])
-
--- | The 'unzip7' function takes a list of seven-tuples and returns
--- seven lists, analogous to 'unzip'.
-unzip7          :: [(a,b,c,d,e,f,g)] -> ([a],[b],[c],[d],[e],[f],[g])
-unzip7          =  foldr (\(a,b,c,d,e,f,g) ~(as,bs,cs,ds,es,fs,gs) ->
-                                (a:as,b:bs,c:cs,d:ds,e:es,f:fs,g:gs))
-                         ([],[],[],[],[],[],[])
-
-
--- | The 'deleteFirstsBy' function takes a predicate and two lists and
--- returns the first list with the first occurrence of each element of
--- the second list removed.
-deleteFirstsBy          :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-deleteFirstsBy eq       =  foldl (flip (deleteBy eq))
-
--- | The 'group' function takes a list and returns a list of lists such
--- that the concatenation of the result is equal to the argument.  Moreover,
--- each sublist in the result contains only equal elements.  For example,
---
--- > group "Mississippi" = ["M","i","ss","i","ss","i","pp","i"]
---
--- It is a special case of 'groupBy', which allows the programmer to supply
--- their own equality test.
-group                   :: Eq a => [a] -> [[a]]
-group                   =  groupBy (==)
-
--- | The 'groupBy' function is the non-overloaded version of 'group'.
-groupBy                 :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [[a]]
-groupBy _  []           =  []
-groupBy eq (x:xs)       =  (x:ys) : groupBy eq zs
-                           where (ys,zs) = span (eq x) xs
-
--- | The 'inits' function returns all initial segments of the argument,
--- shortest first.  For example,
---
--- > inits "abc" == ["","a","ab","abc"]
---
--- Note that 'inits' has the following strictness property:
--- @inits _|_ = [] : _|_@
-inits                   :: [a] -> [[a]]
-inits xs                =  [] : case xs of
-                                  []      -> []
-                                  x : xs' -> map (x :) (inits xs')
-
--- | The 'tails' function returns all final segments of the argument,
--- longest first.  For example,
---
--- > tails "abc" == ["abc", "bc", "c",""]
---
--- Note that 'tails' has the following strictness property:
--- @tails _|_ = _|_ : _|_@
-tails                   :: [a] -> [[a]]
-tails xs                =  xs : case xs of
-                                  []      -> []
-                                  _ : xs' -> tails xs'
-
--- | The 'subsequences' function returns the list of all subsequences of the argument.
---
--- > subsequences "abc" == ["","a","b","ab","c","ac","bc","abc"]
-subsequences            :: [a] -> [[a]]
-subsequences xs         =  [] : nonEmptySubsequences xs
-
--- | The 'nonEmptySubsequences' function returns the list of all subsequences of the argument,
---   except for the empty list.
---
--- > nonEmptySubsequences "abc" == ["a","b","ab","c","ac","bc","abc"]
-nonEmptySubsequences         :: [a] -> [[a]]
-nonEmptySubsequences []      =  []
-nonEmptySubsequences (x:xs)  =  [x] : foldr f [] (nonEmptySubsequences xs)
-  where f ys r = ys : (x : ys) : r
-
-
--- | The 'permutations' function returns the list of all permutations of the argument.
---
--- > permutations "abc" == ["abc","bac","cba","bca","cab","acb"]
-permutations            :: [a] -> [[a]]
-permutations xs0        =  xs0 : perms xs0 []
-  where
-    perms []     _  = []
-    perms (t:ts) is = foldr interleave (perms ts (t:is)) (permutations is)
-      where interleave    xs     r = let (_,zs) = interleave' id xs r in zs
-            interleave' _ []     r = (ts, r)
-            interleave' f (y:ys) r = let (us,zs) = interleave' (f . (y:)) ys r
-                                     in  (y:us, f (t:y:us) : zs)
-
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--- Quick Sort algorithm taken from HBC's QSort library.
-
--- | The 'sort' function implements a stable sorting algorithm.
--- It is a special case of 'sortBy', which allows the programmer to supply
--- their own comparison function.
-sort :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a]
-
--- | The 'sortBy' function is the non-overloaded version of 'sort'.
-sortBy :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a]
-
-#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
-sort = sortBy compare
-sortBy cmp = foldr (insertBy cmp) []
-#else
-
-{-
-GHC's mergesort replaced by a better implementation, 24/12/2009.
-This code originally contributed to the nhc12 compiler by Thomas Nordin
-in 2002.  Rumoured to have been based on code by Lennart Augustsson, e.g.
-    http://www.mail-archive.com/haskell@haskell.org/msg01822.html
-and possibly to bear similarities to a 1982 paper by Richard O'Keefe:
-"A smooth applicative merge sort".
-
-Benchmarks show it to be often 2x the speed of the previous implementation.
-Fixes ticket http://ghc.haskell.org/trac/ghc/ticket/2143
--}
-
-sort = sortBy compare
-sortBy cmp = mergeAll . sequences
-  where
-    sequences (a:b:xs)
-      | a `cmp` b == GT = descending b [a]  xs
-      | otherwise       = ascending  b (a:) xs
-    sequences xs = [xs]
-
-    descending a as (b:bs)
-      | a `cmp` b == GT = descending b (a:as) bs
-    descending a as bs  = (a:as): sequences bs
-
-    ascending a as (b:bs)
-      | a `cmp` b /= GT = ascending b (\ys -> as (a:ys)) bs
-    ascending a as bs   = as [a]: sequences bs
-
-    mergeAll [x] = x
-    mergeAll xs  = mergeAll (mergePairs xs)
-
-    mergePairs (a:b:xs) = merge a b: mergePairs xs
-    mergePairs xs       = xs
-
-    merge as@(a:as') bs@(b:bs')
-      | a `cmp` b == GT = b:merge as  bs'
-      | otherwise       = a:merge as' bs
-    merge [] bs         = bs
-    merge as []         = as
-
-{-
-sortBy cmp l = mergesort cmp l
-sort l = mergesort compare l
-
-Quicksort replaced by mergesort, 14/5/2002.
-
-From: Ian Lynagh <igloo@earth.li>
-
-I am curious as to why the List.sort implementation in GHC is a
-quicksort algorithm rather than an algorithm that guarantees n log n
-time in the worst case? I have attached a mergesort implementation along
-with a few scripts to time it's performance, the results of which are
-shown below (* means it didn't finish successfully - in all cases this
-was due to a stack overflow).
-
-If I heap profile the random_list case with only 10000 then I see
-random_list peaks at using about 2.5M of memory, whereas in the same
-program using List.sort it uses only 100k.
-
-Input style     Input length     Sort data     Sort alg    User time
-stdin           10000            random_list   sort        2.82
-stdin           10000            random_list   mergesort   2.96
-stdin           10000            sorted        sort        31.37
-stdin           10000            sorted        mergesort   1.90
-stdin           10000            revsorted     sort        31.21
-stdin           10000            revsorted     mergesort   1.88
-stdin           100000           random_list   sort        *
-stdin           100000           random_list   mergesort   *
-stdin           100000           sorted        sort        *
-stdin           100000           sorted        mergesort   *
-stdin           100000           revsorted     sort        *
-stdin           100000           revsorted     mergesort   *
-func            10000            random_list   sort        0.31
-func            10000            random_list   mergesort   0.91
-func            10000            sorted        sort        19.09
-func            10000            sorted        mergesort   0.15
-func            10000            revsorted     sort        19.17
-func            10000            revsorted     mergesort   0.16
-func            100000           random_list   sort        3.85
-func            100000           random_list   mergesort   *
-func            100000           sorted        sort        5831.47
-func            100000           sorted        mergesort   2.23
-func            100000           revsorted     sort        5872.34
-func            100000           revsorted     mergesort   2.24
-
-mergesort :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a]
-mergesort cmp = mergesort' cmp . map wrap
-
-mergesort' :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [[a]] -> [a]
-mergesort' _   [] = []
-mergesort' _   [xs] = xs
-mergesort' cmp xss = mergesort' cmp (merge_pairs cmp xss)
-
-merge_pairs :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [[a]] -> [[a]]
-merge_pairs _   [] = []
-merge_pairs _   [xs] = [xs]
-merge_pairs cmp (xs:ys:xss) = merge cmp xs ys : merge_pairs cmp xss
-
-merge :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-merge _   [] ys = ys
-merge _   xs [] = xs
-merge cmp (x:xs) (y:ys)
- = case x `cmp` y of
-        GT -> y : merge cmp (x:xs)   ys
-        _  -> x : merge cmp    xs (y:ys)
-
-wrap :: a -> [a]
-wrap x = [x]
-
-
-
-OLDER: qsort version
-
--- qsort is stable and does not concatenate.
-qsort :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-qsort _   []     r = r
-qsort _   [x]    r = x:r
-qsort cmp (x:xs) r = qpart cmp x xs [] [] r
-
--- qpart partitions and sorts the sublists
-qpart :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> a -> [a] -> [a] -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-qpart cmp x [] rlt rge r =
-    -- rlt and rge are in reverse order and must be sorted with an
-    -- anti-stable sorting
-    rqsort cmp rlt (x:rqsort cmp rge r)
-qpart cmp x (y:ys) rlt rge r =
-    case cmp x y of
-        GT -> qpart cmp x ys (y:rlt) rge r
-        _  -> qpart cmp x ys rlt (y:rge) r
-
--- rqsort is as qsort but anti-stable, i.e. reverses equal elements
-rqsort :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-rqsort _   []     r = r
-rqsort _   [x]    r = x:r
-rqsort cmp (x:xs) r = rqpart cmp x xs [] [] r
-
-rqpart :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> a -> [a] -> [a] -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
-rqpart cmp x [] rle rgt r =
-    qsort cmp rle (x:qsort cmp rgt r)
-rqpart cmp x (y:ys) rle rgt r =
-    case cmp y x of
-        GT -> rqpart cmp x ys rle (y:rgt) r
-        _  -> rqpart cmp x ys (y:rle) rgt r
--}
-
-#endif /* USE_REPORT_PRELUDE */
-
--- | Sort a list by comparing the results of a key function applied to each
--- element.  @sortOn f@ is equivalent to @sortBy . comparing f@, but has the
--- performance advantage of only evaluating @f@ once for each element in the
--- input list.  This is called the decorate-sort-undecorate paradigm, or
--- Schwartzian transform.
---
--- /Since: 4.8.0.0/
-sortOn :: Ord b => (a -> b) -> [a] -> [a]
-sortOn f =
-  map snd . sortBy (comparing fst) . map (\x -> let y = f x in y `seq` (y, x))
-
--- | The 'unfoldr' function is a \`dual\' to 'foldr': while 'foldr'
--- reduces a list to a summary value, 'unfoldr' builds a list from
--- a seed value.  The function takes the element and returns 'Nothing'
--- if it is done producing the list or returns 'Just' @(a,b)@, in which
--- case, @a@ is a prepended to the list and @b@ is used as the next
--- element in a recursive call.  For example,
---
--- > iterate f == unfoldr (\x -> Just (x, f x))
---
--- In some cases, 'unfoldr' can undo a 'foldr' operation:
---
--- > unfoldr f' (foldr f z xs) == xs
---
--- if the following holds:
---
--- > f' (f x y) = Just (x,y)
--- > f' z       = Nothing
---
--- A simple use of unfoldr:
---
--- > unfoldr (\b -> if b == 0 then Nothing else Just (b, b-1)) 10
--- >  [10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1]
---
-
--- Note [INLINE unfoldr]
--- We treat unfoldr a little differently from some other forms for list fusion
--- for two reasons:
---
--- 1. We don't want to use a rule to rewrite a basic form to a fusible
--- form because this would inline before constant floating. As Simon Peyton-
--- Jones and others have pointed out, this could reduce sharing in some cases
--- where sharing is beneficial. Thus we simply INLINE it, which is, for
--- example, how enumFromTo::Int becomes eftInt. Unfortunately, we don't seem
--- to get enough of an inlining discount to get a version of eftInt based on
--- unfoldr to inline as readily as the usual one. We know that all the Maybe
--- nonsense will go away, but the compiler does not.
---
--- 2. The benefit of inlining unfoldr is likely to be huge in many common cases,
--- even apart from list fusion. In particular, inlining unfoldr often
--- allows GHC to erase all the Maybes. This appears to be critical if unfoldr
--- is to be used in high-performance code. A small increase in code size
--- in the relatively rare cases when this does not happen looks like a very
--- small price to pay.
---
--- Doing a back-and-forth dance doesn't seem to accomplish anything if the
--- final form has to be inlined in any case.
-
-unfoldr :: (b -> Maybe (a, b)) -> b -> [a]
-
-{-# INLINE unfoldr #-} -- See Note [INLINE unfoldr]
-unfoldr f b0 = build (\c n ->
-  let go b = case f b of
-               Just (a, new_b) -> a `c` go new_b
-               Nothing         -> n
-  in go b0)
-
--- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
--- | A strict version of 'foldl'.
-foldl'           :: forall a b . (b -> a -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b
-foldl' k z0 xs = foldr (\(v::a) (fn::b->b) (z::b) -> z `seq` fn (k z v)) (id :: b -> b) xs z0
--- Implementing foldl' via foldr is only a good idea if the compiler can optimize
--- the resulting code (eta-expand the recursive "go"), so this needs -fcall-arity!
--- Also see #7994
-
--- | 'foldl1' is a variant of 'foldl' that has no starting value argument,
--- and thus must be applied to non-empty lists.
-foldl1                  :: (a -> a -> a) -> [a] -> a
-foldl1 f (x:xs)         =  foldl f x xs
-foldl1 _ []             =  errorEmptyList "foldl1"
-
--- | A strict version of 'foldl1'
-foldl1'                  :: (a -> a -> a) -> [a] -> a
-foldl1' f (x:xs)         =  foldl' f x xs
-foldl1' _ []             =  errorEmptyList "foldl1'"
-
--- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--- List sum and product
-
--- | The 'sum' function computes the sum of a finite list of numbers.
-sum                     :: (Num a) => [a] -> a
--- | The 'product' function computes the product of a finite list of numbers.
-product                 :: (Num a) => [a] -> a
-
-{-# INLINE sum #-}
-sum                     =  foldl (+) 0
-{-# INLINE product #-}
-product                 =  foldl (*) 1
-
--- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--- Functions on strings
-
--- | 'lines' breaks a string up into a list of strings at newline
--- characters.  The resulting strings do not contain newlines.
-lines                   :: String -> [String]
-lines ""                =  []
--- Somehow GHC doesn't detect the selector thunks in the below code,
--- so s' keeps a reference to the first line via the pair and we have
--- a space leak (cf. #4334).
--- So we need to make GHC see the selector thunks with a trick.
-lines s                 =  cons (case break (== '\n') s of
-                                    (l, s') -> (l, case s' of
-                                                    []      -> []
-                                                    _:s''   -> lines s''))
-  where
-    cons ~(h, t)        =  h : t
-
--- | 'unlines' is an inverse operation to 'lines'.
--- It joins lines, after appending a terminating newline to each.
-unlines                 :: [String] -> String
-#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
-unlines                 =  concatMap (++ "\n")
-#else
--- HBC version (stolen)
--- here's a more efficient version
-unlines [] = []
-unlines (l:ls) = l ++ '\n' : unlines ls
-#endif
-
--- | 'words' breaks a string up into a list of words, which were delimited
--- by white space.
-words                   :: String -> [String]
-words s                 =  case dropWhile {-partain:Char.-}isSpace s of
-                                "" -> []
-                                s' -> w : words s''
-                                      where (w, s'') =
-                                             break {-partain:Char.-}isSpace s'
-
--- | 'unwords' is an inverse operation to 'words'.
--- It joins words with separating spaces.
-unwords                 :: [String] -> String
-#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
-unwords []              =  ""
-unwords ws              =  foldr1 (\w s -> w ++ ' ':s) ws
-#else
--- HBC version (stolen)
--- here's a more efficient version
-unwords []              =  ""
-unwords [w]             = w
-unwords (w:ws)          = w ++ ' ' : unwords ws
-#endif
+import Data.Foldable ()
+import Data.OldList
diff --git a/libraries/base/Data/OldList.hs b/libraries/base/Data/OldList.hs
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..fe0f38e
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,1115 @@
+{-# LANGUAGE Trustworthy #-}
+{-# LANGUAGE CPP, NoImplicitPrelude, ScopedTypeVariables, MagicHash #-}
+
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+-- |
+-- Module      :  Data.List
+-- Copyright   :  (c) The University of Glasgow 2001
+-- License     :  BSD-style (see the file libraries/base/LICENSE)
+--
+-- Maintainer  :  libraries@haskell.org
+-- Stability   :  stable
+-- Portability :  portable
+--
+-- Operations on lists.
+--
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+module Data.OldList
+   (
+   -- * Basic functions
+
+     (++)
+   , head
+   , last
+   , tail
+   , init
+   , uncons
+   , null
+   , length
+
+   -- * List transformations
+   , map
+   , reverse
+
+   , intersperse
+   , intercalate
+   , transpose
+
+   , subsequences
+   , permutations
+
+   -- * Reducing lists (folds)
+
+   , foldl
+   , foldl'
+   , foldl1
+   , foldl1'
+   , foldr
+   , foldr1
+
+   -- ** Special folds
+
+   , concat
+   , concatMap
+   , and
+   , or
+   , any
+   , all
+   , sum
+   , product
+   , maximum
+   , minimum
+
+   -- * Building lists
+
+   -- ** Scans
+   , scanl
+   , scanl1
+   , scanr
+   , scanr1
+
+   -- ** Accumulating maps
+   , mapAccumL
+   , mapAccumR
+
+   -- ** Infinite lists
+   , iterate
+   , repeat
+   , replicate
+   , cycle
+
+   -- ** Unfolding
+   , unfoldr
+
+   -- * Sublists
+
+   -- ** Extracting sublists
+   , take
+   , drop
+   , splitAt
+
+   , takeWhile
+   , dropWhile
+   , dropWhileEnd
+   , span
+   , break
+
+   , stripPrefix
+
+   , group
+
+   , inits
+   , tails
+
+   -- ** Predicates
+   , isPrefixOf
+   , isSuffixOf
+   , isInfixOf
+
+   -- * Searching lists
+
+   -- ** Searching by equality
+   , elem
+   , notElem
+   , lookup
+
+   -- ** Searching with a predicate
+   , find
+   , filter
+   , partition
+
+   -- * Indexing lists
+   -- | These functions treat a list @xs@ as a indexed collection,
+   -- with indices ranging from 0 to @'length' xs - 1@.
+
+   , (!!)
+
+   , elemIndex
+   , elemIndices
+
+   , findIndex
+   , findIndices
+
+   -- * Zipping and unzipping lists
+
+   , zip
+   , zip3
+   , zip4, zip5, zip6, zip7
+
+   , zipWith
+   , zipWith3
+   , zipWith4, zipWith5, zipWith6, zipWith7
+
+   , unzip
+   , unzip3
+   , unzip4, unzip5, unzip6, unzip7
+
+   -- * Special lists
+
+   -- ** Functions on strings
+   , lines
+   , words
+   , unlines
+   , unwords
+
+   -- ** \"Set\" operations
+
+   , nub
+
+   , delete
+   , (\\)
+
+   , union
+   , intersect
+
+   -- ** Ordered lists
+   , sort
+   , sortOn
+   , insert
+
+   -- * Generalized functions
+
+   -- ** The \"@By@\" operations
+   -- | By convention, overloaded functions have a non-overloaded
+   -- counterpart whose name is suffixed with \`@By@\'.
+   --
+   -- It is often convenient to use these functions together with
+   -- 'Data.Function.on', for instance @'sortBy' ('compare'
+   -- \`on\` 'fst')@.
+
+   -- *** User-supplied equality (replacing an @Eq@ context)
+   -- | The predicate is assumed to define an equivalence.
+   , nubBy
+   , deleteBy
+   , deleteFirstsBy
+   , unionBy
+   , intersectBy
+   , groupBy
+
+   -- *** User-supplied comparison (replacing an @Ord@ context)
+   -- | The function is assumed to define a total ordering.
+   , sortBy
+   , insertBy
+   , maximumBy
+   , minimumBy
+
+   -- ** The \"@generic@\" operations
+   -- | The prefix \`@generic@\' indicates an overloaded function that
+   -- is a generalized version of a "Prelude" function.
+
+   , genericLength
+   , genericTake
+   , genericDrop
+   , genericSplitAt
+   , genericIndex
+   , genericReplicate
+
+   ) where
+
+import Data.Maybe
+import Data.Char        ( isSpace )
+import Data.Ord         ( comparing )
+import Data.Tuple       ( fst, snd )
+
+import GHC.Num
+import GHC.Real
+import GHC.List
+import GHC.Base
+
+infix 5 \\ -- comment to fool cpp: https://www.haskell.org/ghc/docs/latest/html/users_guide/options-phases.html#cpp-string-gaps
+
+-- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+-- List functions
+
+-- | The 'dropWhileEnd' function drops the largest suffix of a list
+-- in which the given predicate holds for all elements.  For example:
+--
+-- > dropWhileEnd isSpace "foo\n" == "foo"
+-- > dropWhileEnd isSpace "foo bar" == "foo bar"
+-- > dropWhileEnd isSpace ("foo\n" ++ undefined) == "foo" ++ undefined
+--
+-- /Since: 4.5.0.0/
+dropWhileEnd :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
+dropWhileEnd p = foldr (\x xs -> if p x && null xs then [] else x : xs) []
+
+-- | The 'stripPrefix' function drops the given prefix from a list.
+-- It returns 'Nothing' if the list did not start with the prefix
+-- given, or 'Just' the list after the prefix, if it does.
+--
+-- > stripPrefix "foo" "foobar" == Just "bar"
+-- > stripPrefix "foo" "foo" == Just ""
+-- > stripPrefix "foo" "barfoo" == Nothing
+-- > stripPrefix "foo" "barfoobaz" == Nothing
+stripPrefix :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> Maybe [a]
+stripPrefix [] ys = Just ys
+stripPrefix (x:xs) (y:ys)
+ | x == y = stripPrefix xs ys
+stripPrefix _ _ = Nothing
+
+-- | The 'elemIndex' function returns the index of the first element
+-- in the given list which is equal (by '==') to the query element,
+-- or 'Nothing' if there is no such element.
+elemIndex       :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> Maybe Int
+elemIndex x     = findIndex (x==)
+
+-- | The 'elemIndices' function extends 'elemIndex', by returning the
+-- indices of all elements equal to the query element, in ascending order.
+elemIndices     :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> [Int]
+elemIndices x   = findIndices (x==)
+
+-- | The 'find' function takes a predicate and a list and returns the
+-- first element in the list matching the predicate, or 'Nothing' if
+-- there is no such element.
+find            :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> Maybe a
+find p          = listToMaybe . filter p
+
+-- | The 'findIndex' function takes a predicate and a list and returns
+-- the index of the first element in the list satisfying the predicate,
+-- or 'Nothing' if there is no such element.
+findIndex       :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> Maybe Int
+findIndex p     = listToMaybe . findIndices p
+
+-- | The 'findIndices' function extends 'findIndex', by returning the
+-- indices of all elements satisfying the predicate, in ascending order.
+findIndices      :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [Int]
+#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
+findIndices p xs = [ i | (x,i) <- zip xs [0..], p x]
+#else
+-- Efficient definition
+findIndices p ls = loop 0# ls
+                 where
+                   loop _ [] = []
+                   loop n (x:xs) | p x       = I# n : loop (n +# 1#) xs
+                                 | otherwise = loop (n +# 1#) xs
+#endif  /* USE_REPORT_PRELUDE */
+
+-- | The 'isPrefixOf' function takes two lists and returns 'True'
+-- iff the first list is a prefix of the second.
+isPrefixOf              :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
+isPrefixOf [] _         =  True
+isPrefixOf _  []        =  False
+isPrefixOf (x:xs) (y:ys)=  x == y && isPrefixOf xs ys
+
+-- | The 'isSuffixOf' function takes two lists and returns 'True'
+-- iff the first list is a suffix of the second.
+-- Both lists must be finite.
+isSuffixOf              :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
+isSuffixOf x y          =  reverse x `isPrefixOf` reverse y
+
+-- | The 'isInfixOf' function takes two lists and returns 'True'
+-- iff the first list is contained, wholly and intact,
+-- anywhere within the second.
+--
+-- Example:
+--
+-- >isInfixOf "Haskell" "I really like Haskell." == True
+-- >isInfixOf "Ial" "I really like Haskell." == False
+isInfixOf               :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
+isInfixOf needle haystack = any (isPrefixOf needle) (tails haystack)
+
+-- | /O(n^2)/. The 'nub' function removes duplicate elements from a list.
+-- In particular, it keeps only the first occurrence of each element.
+-- (The name 'nub' means \`essence\'.)
+-- It is a special case of 'nubBy', which allows the programmer to supply
+-- their own equality test.
+nub                     :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a]
+#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
+nub                     =  nubBy (==)
+#else
+-- stolen from HBC
+nub l                   = nub' l []             -- '
+  where
+    nub' [] _           = []                    -- '
+    nub' (x:xs) ls                              -- '
+        | x `elem` ls   = nub' xs ls            -- '
+        | otherwise     = x : nub' xs (x:ls)    -- '
+#endif
+
+-- | The 'nubBy' function behaves just like 'nub', except it uses a
+-- user-supplied equality predicate instead of the overloaded '=='
+-- function.
+nubBy                   :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
+#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
+nubBy eq []             =  []
+nubBy eq (x:xs)         =  x : nubBy eq (filter (\ y -> not (eq x y)) xs)
+#else
+nubBy eq l              = nubBy' l []
+  where
+    nubBy' [] _         = []
+    nubBy' (y:ys) xs
+       | elem_by eq y xs = nubBy' ys xs
+       | otherwise       = y : nubBy' ys (y:xs)
+
+-- Not exported:
+-- Note that we keep the call to `eq` with arguments in the
+-- same order as in the reference implementation
+-- 'xs' is the list of things we've seen so far,
+-- 'y' is the potential new element
+elem_by :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> a -> [a] -> Bool
+elem_by _  _ []         =  False
+elem_by eq y (x:xs)     =  y `eq` x || elem_by eq y xs
+#endif
+
+
+-- | 'delete' @x@ removes the first occurrence of @x@ from its list argument.
+-- For example,
+--
+-- > delete 'a' "banana" == "bnana"
+--
+-- It is a special case of 'deleteBy', which allows the programmer to
+-- supply their own equality test.
+
+delete                  :: (Eq a) => a -> [a] -> [a]
+delete                  =  deleteBy (==)
+
+-- | The 'deleteBy' function behaves like 'delete', but takes a
+-- user-supplied equality predicate.
+deleteBy                :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> a -> [a] -> [a]
+deleteBy _  _ []        = []
+deleteBy eq x (y:ys)    = if x `eq` y then ys else y : deleteBy eq x ys
+
+-- | The '\\' function is list difference (non-associative).
+-- In the result of @xs@ '\\' @ys@, the first occurrence of each element of
+-- @ys@ in turn (if any) has been removed from @xs@.  Thus
+--
+-- > (xs ++ ys) \\ xs == ys.
+--
+-- It is a special case of 'deleteFirstsBy', which allows the programmer
+-- to supply their own equality test.
+
+(\\)                    :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+(\\)                    =  foldl (flip delete)
+
+-- | The 'union' function returns the list union of the two lists.
+-- For example,
+--
+-- > "dog" `union` "cow" == "dogcw"
+--
+-- Duplicates, and elements of the first list, are removed from the
+-- the second list, but if the first list contains duplicates, so will
+-- the result.
+-- It is a special case of 'unionBy', which allows the programmer to supply
+-- their own equality test.
+
+union                   :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+union                   = unionBy (==)
+
+-- | The 'unionBy' function is the non-overloaded version of 'union'.
+unionBy                 :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+unionBy eq xs ys        =  xs ++ foldl (flip (deleteBy eq)) (nubBy eq ys) xs
+
+-- | The 'intersect' function takes the list intersection of two lists.
+-- For example,
+--
+-- > [1,2,3,4] `intersect` [2,4,6,8] == [2,4]
+--
+-- If the first list contains duplicates, so will the result.
+--
+-- > [1,2,2,3,4] `intersect` [6,4,4,2] == [2,2,4]
+--
+-- It is a special case of 'intersectBy', which allows the programmer to
+-- supply their own equality test. If the element is found in both the first
+-- and the second list, the element from the first list will be used.
+
+intersect               :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+intersect               =  intersectBy (==)
+
+-- | The 'intersectBy' function is the non-overloaded version of 'intersect'.
+intersectBy             :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+intersectBy _  [] _     =  []
+intersectBy _  _  []    =  []
+intersectBy eq xs ys    =  [x | x <- xs, any (eq x) ys]
+
+-- | The 'intersperse' function takes an element and a list and
+-- \`intersperses\' that element between the elements of the list.
+-- For example,
+--
+-- > intersperse ',' "abcde" == "a,b,c,d,e"
+
+intersperse             :: a -> [a] -> [a]
+intersperse _   []      = []
+intersperse sep (x:xs)  = x : prependToAll sep xs
+
+
+-- Not exported:
+-- We want to make every element in the 'intersperse'd list available
+-- as soon as possible to avoid space leaks. Experiments suggested that
+-- a separate top-level helper is more efficient than a local worker.
+prependToAll            :: a -> [a] -> [a]
+prependToAll _   []     = []
+prependToAll sep (x:xs) = sep : x : prependToAll sep xs
+
+-- | 'intercalate' @xs xss@ is equivalent to @('concat' ('intersperse' xs xss))@.
+-- It inserts the list @xs@ in between the lists in @xss@ and concatenates the
+-- result.
+intercalate :: [a] -> [[a]] -> [a]
+intercalate xs xss = concat (intersperse xs xss)
+
+-- | The 'transpose' function transposes the rows and columns of its argument.
+-- For example,
+--
+-- > transpose [[1,2,3],[4,5,6]] == [[1,4],[2,5],[3,6]]
+
+transpose               :: [[a]] -> [[a]]
+transpose []             = []
+transpose ([]   : xss)   = transpose xss
+transpose ((x:xs) : xss) = (x : [h | (h:_) <- xss]) : transpose (xs : [ t | (_:t) <- xss])
+
+
+-- | The 'partition' function takes a predicate a list and returns
+-- the pair of lists of elements which do and do not satisfy the
+-- predicate, respectively; i.e.,
+--
+-- > partition p xs == (filter p xs, filter (not . p) xs)
+
+partition               :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> ([a],[a])
+{-# INLINE partition #-}
+partition p xs = foldr (select p) ([],[]) xs
+
+select :: (a -> Bool) -> a -> ([a], [a]) -> ([a], [a])
+select p x ~(ts,fs) | p x       = (x:ts,fs)
+                    | otherwise = (ts, x:fs)
+
+-- | The 'mapAccumL' function behaves like a combination of 'map' and
+-- 'foldl'; it applies a function to each element of a list, passing
+-- an accumulating parameter from left to right, and returning a final
+-- value of this accumulator together with the new list.
+mapAccumL :: (acc -> x -> (acc, y)) -- Function of elt of input list
+                                    -- and accumulator, returning new
+                                    -- accumulator and elt of result list
+          -> acc            -- Initial accumulator
+          -> [x]            -- Input list
+          -> (acc, [y])     -- Final accumulator and result list
+mapAccumL _ s []        =  (s, [])
+mapAccumL f s (x:xs)    =  (s'',y:ys)
+                           where (s', y ) = f s x
+                                 (s'',ys) = mapAccumL f s' xs
+
+-- | The 'mapAccumR' function behaves like a combination of 'map' and
+-- 'foldr'; it applies a function to each element of a list, passing
+-- an accumulating parameter from right to left, and returning a final
+-- value of this accumulator together with the new list.
+mapAccumR :: (acc -> x -> (acc, y))     -- Function of elt of input list
+                                        -- and accumulator, returning new
+                                        -- accumulator and elt of result list
+            -> acc              -- Initial accumulator
+            -> [x]              -- Input list
+            -> (acc, [y])               -- Final accumulator and result list
+mapAccumR _ s []        =  (s, [])
+mapAccumR f s (x:xs)    =  (s'', y:ys)
+                           where (s'',y ) = f s' x
+                                 (s', ys) = mapAccumR f s xs
+
+-- | The 'insert' function takes an element and a list and inserts the
+-- element into the list at the first position where it is less
+-- than or equal to the next element.  In particular, if the list
+-- is sorted before the call, the result will also be sorted.
+-- It is a special case of 'insertBy', which allows the programmer to
+-- supply their own comparison function.
+insert :: Ord a => a -> [a] -> [a]
+insert e ls = insertBy (compare) e ls
+
+-- | The non-overloaded version of 'insert'.
+insertBy :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> a -> [a] -> [a]
+insertBy _   x [] = [x]
+insertBy cmp x ys@(y:ys')
+ = case cmp x y of
+     GT -> y : insertBy cmp x ys'
+     _  -> x : ys
+
+-- | 'maximum' returns the maximum value from a list,
+-- which must be non-empty, finite, and of an ordered type.
+-- It is a special case of 'Data.List.maximumBy', which allows the
+-- programmer to supply their own comparison function.
+maximum                 :: (Ord a) => [a] -> a
+{-# INLINE [1] maximum #-}
+maximum []              =  errorEmptyList "maximum"
+maximum xs              =  foldl1 max xs
+
+{-# RULES
+  "maximumInt"     maximum = (strictMaximum :: [Int]     -> Int);
+  "maximumInteger" maximum = (strictMaximum :: [Integer] -> Integer)
+ #-}
+
+-- We can't make the overloaded version of maximum strict without
+-- changing its semantics (max might not be strict), but we can for
+-- the version specialised to 'Int'.
+strictMaximum           :: (Ord a) => [a] -> a
+strictMaximum []        =  errorEmptyList "maximum"
+strictMaximum xs        =  foldl1' max xs
+
+-- | 'minimum' returns the minimum value from a list,
+-- which must be non-empty, finite, and of an ordered type.
+-- It is a special case of 'Data.List.minimumBy', which allows the
+-- programmer to supply their own comparison function.
+minimum                 :: (Ord a) => [a] -> a
+{-# INLINE [1] minimum #-}
+minimum []              =  errorEmptyList "minimum"
+minimum xs              =  foldl1 min xs
+
+{-# RULES
+  "minimumInt"     minimum = (strictMinimum :: [Int]     -> Int);
+  "minimumInteger" minimum = (strictMinimum :: [Integer] -> Integer)
+ #-}
+
+strictMinimum           :: (Ord a) => [a] -> a
+strictMinimum []        =  errorEmptyList "minimum"
+strictMinimum xs        =  foldl1' min xs
+
+-- | The 'maximumBy' function takes a comparison function and a list
+-- and returns the greatest element of the list by the comparison function.
+-- The list must be finite and non-empty.
+maximumBy               :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> a
+maximumBy _ []          =  error "List.maximumBy: empty list"
+maximumBy cmp xs        =  foldl1 maxBy xs
+                        where
+                           maxBy x y = case cmp x y of
+                                       GT -> x
+                                       _  -> y
+
+-- | The 'minimumBy' function takes a comparison function and a list
+-- and returns the least element of the list by the comparison function.
+-- The list must be finite and non-empty.
+minimumBy               :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> a
+minimumBy _ []          =  error "List.minimumBy: empty list"
+minimumBy cmp xs        =  foldl1 minBy xs
+                        where
+                           minBy x y = case cmp x y of
+                                       GT -> y
+                                       _  -> x
+
+-- | The 'genericLength' function is an overloaded version of 'length'.  In
+-- particular, instead of returning an 'Int', it returns any type which is
+-- an instance of 'Num'.  It is, however, less efficient than 'length'.
+genericLength           :: (Num i) => [a] -> i
+{-# NOINLINE [1] genericLength #-}
+genericLength []        =  0
+genericLength (_:l)     =  1 + genericLength l
+
+{-# RULES
+  "genericLengthInt"     genericLength = (strictGenericLength :: [a] -> Int);
+  "genericLengthInteger" genericLength = (strictGenericLength :: [a] -> Integer);
+ #-}
+
+strictGenericLength     :: (Num i) => [b] -> i
+strictGenericLength l   =  gl l 0
+                        where
+                           gl [] a     = a
+                           gl (_:xs) a = let a' = a + 1 in a' `seq` gl xs a'
+
+-- | The 'genericTake' function is an overloaded version of 'take', which
+-- accepts any 'Integral' value as the number of elements to take.
+genericTake             :: (Integral i) => i -> [a] -> [a]
+genericTake n _ | n <= 0 = []
+genericTake _ []        =  []
+genericTake n (x:xs)    =  x : genericTake (n-1) xs
+
+-- | The 'genericDrop' function is an overloaded version of 'drop', which
+-- accepts any 'Integral' value as the number of elements to drop.
+genericDrop             :: (Integral i) => i -> [a] -> [a]
+genericDrop n xs | n <= 0 = xs
+genericDrop _ []        =  []
+genericDrop n (_:xs)    =  genericDrop (n-1) xs
+
+
+-- | The 'genericSplitAt' function is an overloaded version of 'splitAt', which
+-- accepts any 'Integral' value as the position at which to split.
+genericSplitAt          :: (Integral i) => i -> [a] -> ([a], [a])
+genericSplitAt n xs | n <= 0 =  ([],xs)
+genericSplitAt _ []     =  ([],[])
+genericSplitAt n (x:xs) =  (x:xs',xs'') where
+    (xs',xs'') = genericSplitAt (n-1) xs
+
+-- | The 'genericIndex' function is an overloaded version of '!!', which
+-- accepts any 'Integral' value as the index.
+genericIndex :: (Integral i) => [a] -> i -> a
+genericIndex (x:_)  0 = x
+genericIndex (_:xs) n
+ | n > 0     = genericIndex xs (n-1)
+ | otherwise = error "List.genericIndex: negative argument."
+genericIndex _ _      = error "List.genericIndex: index too large."
+
+-- | The 'genericReplicate' function is an overloaded version of 'replicate',
+-- which accepts any 'Integral' value as the number of repetitions to make.
+genericReplicate        :: (Integral i) => i -> a -> [a]
+genericReplicate n x    =  genericTake n (repeat x)
+
+-- | The 'zip4' function takes four lists and returns a list of
+-- quadruples, analogous to 'zip'.
+zip4                    :: [a] -> [b] -> [c] -> [d] -> [(a,b,c,d)]
+zip4                    =  zipWith4 (,,,)
+
+-- | The 'zip5' function takes five lists and returns a list of
+-- five-tuples, analogous to 'zip'.
+zip5                    :: [a] -> [b] -> [c] -> [d] -> [e] -> [(a,b,c,d,e)]
+zip5                    =  zipWith5 (,,,,)
+
+-- | The 'zip6' function takes six lists and returns a list of six-tuples,
+-- analogous to 'zip'.
+zip6                    :: [a] -> [b] -> [c] -> [d] -> [e] -> [f] ->
+                              [(a,b,c,d,e,f)]
+zip6                    =  zipWith6 (,,,,,)
+
+-- | The 'zip7' function takes seven lists and returns a list of
+-- seven-tuples, analogous to 'zip'.
+zip7                    :: [a] -> [b] -> [c] -> [d] -> [e] -> [f] ->
+                              [g] -> [(a,b,c,d,e,f,g)]
+zip7                    =  zipWith7 (,,,,,,)
+
+-- | The 'zipWith4' function takes a function which combines four
+-- elements, as well as four lists and returns a list of their point-wise
+-- combination, analogous to 'zipWith'.
+zipWith4                :: (a->b->c->d->e) -> [a]->[b]->[c]->[d]->[e]
+zipWith4 z (a:as) (b:bs) (c:cs) (d:ds)
+                        =  z a b c d : zipWith4 z as bs cs ds
+zipWith4 _ _ _ _ _      =  []
+
+-- | The 'zipWith5' function takes a function which combines five
+-- elements, as well as five lists and returns a list of their point-wise
+-- combination, analogous to 'zipWith'.
+zipWith5                :: (a->b->c->d->e->f) ->
+                           [a]->[b]->[c]->[d]->[e]->[f]
+zipWith5 z (a:as) (b:bs) (c:cs) (d:ds) (e:es)
+                        =  z a b c d e : zipWith5 z as bs cs ds es
+zipWith5 _ _ _ _ _ _    = []
+
+-- | The 'zipWith6' function takes a function which combines six
+-- elements, as well as six lists and returns a list of their point-wise
+-- combination, analogous to 'zipWith'.
+zipWith6                :: (a->b->c->d->e->f->g) ->
+                           [a]->[b]->[c]->[d]->[e]->[f]->[g]
+zipWith6 z (a:as) (b:bs) (c:cs) (d:ds) (e:es) (f:fs)
+                        =  z a b c d e f : zipWith6 z as bs cs ds es fs
+zipWith6 _ _ _ _ _ _ _  = []
+
+-- | The 'zipWith7' function takes a function which combines seven
+-- elements, as well as seven lists and returns a list of their point-wise
+-- combination, analogous to 'zipWith'.
+zipWith7                :: (a->b->c->d->e->f->g->h) ->
+                           [a]->[b]->[c]->[d]->[e]->[f]->[g]->[h]
+zipWith7 z (a:as) (b:bs) (c:cs) (d:ds) (e:es) (f:fs) (g:gs)
+                   =  z a b c d e f g : zipWith7 z as bs cs ds es fs gs
+zipWith7 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ = []
+
+-- | The 'unzip4' function takes a list of quadruples and returns four
+-- lists, analogous to 'unzip'.
+unzip4                  :: [(a,b,c,d)] -> ([a],[b],[c],[d])
+unzip4                  =  foldr (\(a,b,c,d) ~(as,bs,cs,ds) ->
+                                        (a:as,b:bs,c:cs,d:ds))
+                                 ([],[],[],[])
+
+-- | The 'unzip5' function takes a list of five-tuples and returns five
+-- lists, analogous to 'unzip'.
+unzip5                  :: [(a,b,c,d,e)] -> ([a],[b],[c],[d],[e])
+unzip5                  =  foldr (\(a,b,c,d,e) ~(as,bs,cs,ds,es) ->
+                                        (a:as,b:bs,c:cs,d:ds,e:es))
+                                 ([],[],[],[],[])
+
+-- | The 'unzip6' function takes a list of six-tuples and returns six
+-- lists, analogous to 'unzip'.
+unzip6                  :: [(a,b,c,d,e,f)] -> ([a],[b],[c],[d],[e],[f])
+unzip6                  =  foldr (\(a,b,c,d,e,f) ~(as,bs,cs,ds,es,fs) ->
+                                        (a:as,b:bs,c:cs,d:ds,e:es,f:fs))
+                                 ([],[],[],[],[],[])
+
+-- | The 'unzip7' function takes a list of seven-tuples and returns
+-- seven lists, analogous to 'unzip'.
+unzip7          :: [(a,b,c,d,e,f,g)] -> ([a],[b],[c],[d],[e],[f],[g])
+unzip7          =  foldr (\(a,b,c,d,e,f,g) ~(as,bs,cs,ds,es,fs,gs) ->
+                                (a:as,b:bs,c:cs,d:ds,e:es,f:fs,g:gs))
+                         ([],[],[],[],[],[],[])
+
+
+-- | The 'deleteFirstsBy' function takes a predicate and two lists and
+-- returns the first list with the first occurrence of each element of
+-- the second list removed.
+deleteFirstsBy          :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+deleteFirstsBy eq       =  foldl (flip (deleteBy eq))
+
+-- | The 'group' function takes a list and returns a list of lists such
+-- that the concatenation of the result is equal to the argument.  Moreover,
+-- each sublist in the result contains only equal elements.  For example,
+--
+-- > group "Mississippi" = ["M","i","ss","i","ss","i","pp","i"]
+--
+-- It is a special case of 'groupBy', which allows the programmer to supply
+-- their own equality test.
+group                   :: Eq a => [a] -> [[a]]
+group                   =  groupBy (==)
+
+-- | The 'groupBy' function is the non-overloaded version of 'group'.
+groupBy                 :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [[a]]
+groupBy _  []           =  []
+groupBy eq (x:xs)       =  (x:ys) : groupBy eq zs
+                           where (ys,zs) = span (eq x) xs
+
+-- | The 'inits' function returns all initial segments of the argument,
+-- shortest first.  For example,
+--
+-- > inits "abc" == ["","a","ab","abc"]
+--
+-- Note that 'inits' has the following strictness property:
+-- @inits _|_ = [] : _|_@
+inits                   :: [a] -> [[a]]
+inits xs                =  [] : case xs of
+                                  []      -> []
+                                  x : xs' -> map (x :) (inits xs')
+
+-- | The 'tails' function returns all final segments of the argument,
+-- longest first.  For example,
+--
+-- > tails "abc" == ["abc", "bc", "c",""]
+--
+-- Note that 'tails' has the following strictness property:
+-- @tails _|_ = _|_ : _|_@
+tails                   :: [a] -> [[a]]
+tails xs                =  xs : case xs of
+                                  []      -> []
+                                  _ : xs' -> tails xs'
+
+-- | The 'subsequences' function returns the list of all subsequences of the argument.
+--
+-- > subsequences "abc" == ["","a","b","ab","c","ac","bc","abc"]
+subsequences            :: [a] -> [[a]]
+subsequences xs         =  [] : nonEmptySubsequences xs
+
+-- | The 'nonEmptySubsequences' function returns the list of all subsequences of the argument,
+--   except for the empty list.
+--
+-- > nonEmptySubsequences "abc" == ["a","b","ab","c","ac","bc","abc"]
+nonEmptySubsequences         :: [a] -> [[a]]
+nonEmptySubsequences []      =  []
+nonEmptySubsequences (x:xs)  =  [x] : foldr f [] (nonEmptySubsequences xs)
+  where f ys r = ys : (x : ys) : r
+
+
+-- | The 'permutations' function returns the list of all permutations of the argument.
+--
+-- > permutations "abc" == ["abc","bac","cba","bca","cab","acb"]
+permutations            :: [a] -> [[a]]
+permutations xs0        =  xs0 : perms xs0 []
+  where
+    perms []     _  = []
+    perms (t:ts) is = foldr interleave (perms ts (t:is)) (permutations is)
+      where interleave    xs     r = let (_,zs) = interleave' id xs r in zs
+            interleave' _ []     r = (ts, r)
+            interleave' f (y:ys) r = let (us,zs) = interleave' (f . (y:)) ys r
+                                     in  (y:us, f (t:y:us) : zs)
+
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+-- Quick Sort algorithm taken from HBC's QSort library.
+
+-- | The 'sort' function implements a stable sorting algorithm.
+-- It is a special case of 'sortBy', which allows the programmer to supply
+-- their own comparison function.
+sort :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a]
+
+-- | The 'sortBy' function is the non-overloaded version of 'sort'.
+sortBy :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a]
+
+#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
+sort = sortBy compare
+sortBy cmp = foldr (insertBy cmp) []
+#else
+
+{-
+GHC's mergesort replaced by a better implementation, 24/12/2009.
+This code originally contributed to the nhc12 compiler by Thomas Nordin
+in 2002.  Rumoured to have been based on code by Lennart Augustsson, e.g.
+    http://www.mail-archive.com/haskell@haskell.org/msg01822.html
+and possibly to bear similarities to a 1982 paper by Richard O'Keefe:
+"A smooth applicative merge sort".
+
+Benchmarks show it to be often 2x the speed of the previous implementation.
+Fixes ticket http://ghc.haskell.org/trac/ghc/ticket/2143
+-}
+
+sort = sortBy compare
+sortBy cmp = mergeAll . sequences
+  where
+    sequences (a:b:xs)
+      | a `cmp` b == GT = descending b [a]  xs
+      | otherwise       = ascending  b (a:) xs
+    sequences xs = [xs]
+
+    descending a as (b:bs)
+      | a `cmp` b == GT = descending b (a:as) bs
+    descending a as bs  = (a:as): sequences bs
+
+    ascending a as (b:bs)
+      | a `cmp` b /= GT = ascending b (\ys -> as (a:ys)) bs
+    ascending a as bs   = as [a]: sequences bs
+
+    mergeAll [x] = x
+    mergeAll xs  = mergeAll (mergePairs xs)
+
+    mergePairs (a:b:xs) = merge a b: mergePairs xs
+    mergePairs xs       = xs
+
+    merge as@(a:as') bs@(b:bs')
+      | a `cmp` b == GT = b:merge as  bs'
+      | otherwise       = a:merge as' bs
+    merge [] bs         = bs
+    merge as []         = as
+
+{-
+sortBy cmp l = mergesort cmp l
+sort l = mergesort compare l
+
+Quicksort replaced by mergesort, 14/5/2002.
+
+From: Ian Lynagh <igloo@earth.li>
+
+I am curious as to why the List.sort implementation in GHC is a
+quicksort algorithm rather than an algorithm that guarantees n log n
+time in the worst case? I have attached a mergesort implementation along
+with a few scripts to time it's performance, the results of which are
+shown below (* means it didn't finish successfully - in all cases this
+was due to a stack overflow).
+
+If I heap profile the random_list case with only 10000 then I see
+random_list peaks at using about 2.5M of memory, whereas in the same
+program using List.sort it uses only 100k.
+
+Input style     Input length     Sort data     Sort alg    User time
+stdin           10000            random_list   sort        2.82
+stdin           10000            random_list   mergesort   2.96
+stdin           10000            sorted        sort        31.37
+stdin           10000            sorted        mergesort   1.90
+stdin           10000            revsorted     sort        31.21
+stdin           10000            revsorted     mergesort   1.88
+stdin           100000           random_list   sort        *
+stdin           100000           random_list   mergesort   *
+stdin           100000           sorted        sort        *
+stdin           100000           sorted        mergesort   *
+stdin           100000           revsorted     sort        *
+stdin           100000           revsorted     mergesort   *
+func            10000            random_list   sort        0.31
+func            10000            random_list   mergesort   0.91
+func            10000            sorted        sort        19.09
+func            10000            sorted        mergesort   0.15
+func            10000            revsorted     sort        19.17
+func            10000            revsorted     mergesort   0.16
+func            100000           random_list   sort        3.85
+func            100000           random_list   mergesort   *
+func            100000           sorted        sort        5831.47
+func            100000           sorted        mergesort   2.23
+func            100000           revsorted     sort        5872.34
+func            100000           revsorted     mergesort   2.24
+
+mergesort :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a]
+mergesort cmp = mergesort' cmp . map wrap
+
+mergesort' :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [[a]] -> [a]
+mergesort' _   [] = []
+mergesort' _   [xs] = xs
+mergesort' cmp xss = mergesort' cmp (merge_pairs cmp xss)
+
+merge_pairs :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [[a]] -> [[a]]
+merge_pairs _   [] = []
+merge_pairs _   [xs] = [xs]
+merge_pairs cmp (xs:ys:xss) = merge cmp xs ys : merge_pairs cmp xss
+
+merge :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+merge _   [] ys = ys
+merge _   xs [] = xs
+merge cmp (x:xs) (y:ys)
+ = case x `cmp` y of
+        GT -> y : merge cmp (x:xs)   ys
+        _  -> x : merge cmp    xs (y:ys)
+
+wrap :: a -> [a]
+wrap x = [x]
+
+
+
+OLDER: qsort version
+
+-- qsort is stable and does not concatenate.
+qsort :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+qsort _   []     r = r
+qsort _   [x]    r = x:r
+qsort cmp (x:xs) r = qpart cmp x xs [] [] r
+
+-- qpart partitions and sorts the sublists
+qpart :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> a -> [a] -> [a] -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+qpart cmp x [] rlt rge r =
+    -- rlt and rge are in reverse order and must be sorted with an
+    -- anti-stable sorting
+    rqsort cmp rlt (x:rqsort cmp rge r)
+qpart cmp x (y:ys) rlt rge r =
+    case cmp x y of
+        GT -> qpart cmp x ys (y:rlt) rge r
+        _  -> qpart cmp x ys rlt (y:rge) r
+
+-- rqsort is as qsort but anti-stable, i.e. reverses equal elements
+rqsort :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+rqsort _   []     r = r
+rqsort _   [x]    r = x:r
+rqsort cmp (x:xs) r = rqpart cmp x xs [] [] r
+
+rqpart :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> a -> [a] -> [a] -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
+rqpart cmp x [] rle rgt r =
+    qsort cmp rle (x:qsort cmp rgt r)
+rqpart cmp x (y:ys) rle rgt r =
+    case cmp y x of
+        GT -> rqpart cmp x ys rle (y:rgt) r
+        _  -> rqpart cmp x ys (y:rle) rgt r
+-}
+
+#endif /* USE_REPORT_PRELUDE */
+
+-- | Sort a list by comparing the results of a key function applied to each
+-- element.  @sortOn f@ is equivalent to @sortBy . comparing f@, but has the
+-- performance advantage of only evaluating @f@ once for each element in the
+-- input list.  This is called the decorate-sort-undecorate paradigm, or
+-- Schwartzian transform.
+--
+-- /Since: 4.8.0.0/
+sortOn :: Ord b => (a -> b) -> [a] -> [a]
+sortOn f =
+  map snd . sortBy (comparing fst) . map (\x -> let y = f x in y `seq` (y, x))
+
+-- | The 'unfoldr' function is a \`dual\' to 'foldr': while 'foldr'
+-- reduces a list to a summary value, 'unfoldr' builds a list from
+-- a seed value.  The function takes the element and returns 'Nothing'
+-- if it is done producing the list or returns 'Just' @(a,b)@, in which
+-- case, @a@ is a prepended to the list and @b@ is used as the next
+-- element in a recursive call.  For example,
+--
+-- > iterate f == unfoldr (\x -> Just (x, f x))
+--
+-- In some cases, 'unfoldr' can undo a 'foldr' operation:
+--
+-- > unfoldr f' (foldr f z xs) == xs
+--
+-- if the following holds:
+--
+-- > f' (f x y) = Just (x,y)
+-- > f' z       = Nothing
+--
+-- A simple use of unfoldr:
+--
+-- > unfoldr (\b -> if b == 0 then Nothing else Just (b, b-1)) 10
+-- >  [10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1]
+--
+
+-- Note [INLINE unfoldr]
+-- We treat unfoldr a little differently from some other forms for list fusion
+-- for two reasons:
+--
+-- 1. We don't want to use a rule to rewrite a basic form to a fusible
+-- form because this would inline before constant floating. As Simon Peyton-
+-- Jones and others have pointed out, this could reduce sharing in some cases
+-- where sharing is beneficial. Thus we simply INLINE it, which is, for
+-- example, how enumFromTo::Int becomes eftInt. Unfortunately, we don't seem
+-- to get enough of an inlining discount to get a version of eftInt based on
+-- unfoldr to inline as readily as the usual one. We know that all the Maybe
+-- nonsense will go away, but the compiler does not.
+--
+-- 2. The benefit of inlining unfoldr is likely to be huge in many common cases,
+-- even apart from list fusion. In particular, inlining unfoldr often
+-- allows GHC to erase all the Maybes. This appears to be critical if unfoldr
+-- is to be used in high-performance code. A small increase in code size
+-- in the relatively rare cases when this does not happen looks like a very
+-- small price to pay.
+--
+-- Doing a back-and-forth dance doesn't seem to accomplish anything if the
+-- final form has to be inlined in any case.
+
+unfoldr :: (b -> Maybe (a, b)) -> b -> [a]
+
+{-# INLINE unfoldr #-} -- See Note [INLINE unfoldr]
+unfoldr f b0 = build (\c n ->
+  let go b = case f b of
+               Just (a, new_b) -> a `c` go new_b
+               Nothing         -> n
+  in go b0)
+
+-- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+-- | A strict version of 'foldl'.
+foldl'           :: forall a b . (b -> a -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b
+foldl' k z0 xs = foldr (\(v::a) (fn::b->b) (z::b) -> z `seq` fn (k z v)) (id :: b -> b) xs z0
+-- Implementing foldl' via foldr is only a good idea if the compiler can optimize
+-- the resulting code (eta-expand the recursive "go"), so this needs -fcall-arity!
+-- Also see #7994
+
+-- | 'foldl1' is a variant of 'foldl' that has no starting value argument,
+-- and thus must be applied to non-empty lists.
+foldl1                  :: (a -> a -> a) -> [a] -> a
+foldl1 f (x:xs)         =  foldl f x xs
+foldl1 _ []             =  errorEmptyList "foldl1"
+
+-- | A strict version of 'foldl1'
+foldl1'                  :: (a -> a -> a) -> [a] -> a
+foldl1' f (x:xs)         =  foldl' f x xs
+foldl1' _ []             =  errorEmptyList "foldl1'"
+
+-- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+-- List sum and product
+
+-- | The 'sum' function computes the sum of a finite list of numbers.
+sum                     :: (Num a) => [a] -> a
+-- | The 'product' function computes the product of a finite list of numbers.
+product                 :: (Num a) => [a] -> a
+
+{-# INLINE sum #-}
+sum                     =  foldl (+) 0
+{-# INLINE product #-}
+product                 =  foldl (*) 1
+
+-- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+-- Functions on strings
+
+-- | 'lines' breaks a string up into a list of strings at newline
+-- characters.  The resulting strings do not contain newlines.
+lines                   :: String -> [String]
+lines ""                =  []
+-- Somehow GHC doesn't detect the selector thunks in the below code,
+-- so s' keeps a reference to the first line via the pair and we have
+-- a space leak (cf. #4334).
+-- So we need to make GHC see the selector thunks with a trick.
+lines s                 =  cons (case break (== '\n') s of
+                                    (l, s') -> (l, case s' of
+                                                    []      -> []
+                                                    _:s''   -> lines s''))
+  where
+    cons ~(h, t)        =  h : t
+
+-- | 'unlines' is an inverse operation to 'lines'.
+-- It joins lines, after appending a terminating newline to each.
+unlines                 :: [String] -> String
+#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
+unlines                 =  concatMap (++ "\n")
+#else
+-- HBC version (stolen)
+-- here's a more efficient version
+unlines [] = []
+unlines (l:ls) = l ++ '\n' : unlines ls
+#endif
+
+-- | 'words' breaks a string up into a list of words, which were delimited
+-- by white space.
+words                   :: String -> [String]
+words s                 =  case dropWhile {-partain:Char.-}isSpace s of
+                                "" -> []
+                                s' -> w : words s''
+                                      where (w, s'') =
+                                             break {-partain:Char.-}isSpace s'
+
+-- | 'unwords' is an inverse operation to 'words'.
+-- It joins words with separating spaces.
+unwords                 :: [String] -> String
+#ifdef USE_REPORT_PRELUDE
+unwords []              =  ""
+unwords ws              =  foldr1 (\w s -> w ++ ' ':s) ws
+#else
+-- HBC version (stolen)
+-- here's a more efficient version
+unwords []              =  ""
+unwords [w]             = w
+unwords (w:ws)          = w ++ ' ' : unwords ws
+#endif
index d5e39c5..7686940 100644 (file)
@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ module Data.OldTypeable.Internal {-# DEPRECATED "Use Data.Typeable.Internal inst
 import GHC.Base
 import GHC.Word
 import GHC.Show
-import Data.List
+import Data.OldList
 import GHC.Num
 import GHC.Real
 import GHC.IORef
index f57cf9b..f1bd45e 100644 (file)
@@ -23,13 +23,12 @@ module GHC.Event.Internal
     ) where
 
 import Data.Bits ((.|.), (.&.))
-import Data.List (foldl', intercalate)
+import Data.OldList (foldl', filter, intercalate, null)
 import Foreign.C.Error (eINTR, getErrno, throwErrno)
 import System.Posix.Types (Fd)
 import GHC.Base
 import GHC.Num (Num(..))
 import GHC.Show (Show(..))
-import GHC.List (filter, null)
 
 -- | An I\/O event.
 newtype Event = Event Int
index 6499da8..aa0fc93 100755 (executable)
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ import GHC.Stack
 
 import qualified Data.Coerce
 import Data.String
-import Data.List
+import Data.OldList
 import Data.Data
 import Data.Ord
 import qualified Debug.Trace
index 53414c9..72100d6 100644 (file)
@@ -148,7 +148,7 @@ import Data.Maybe
 import Data.Traversable ( Traversable )
 import Data.Tuple
 
-import GHC.Base
+import GHC.Base hiding ( foldr )
 import Text.Read
 import GHC.Enum
 import GHC.Num
index 74297bb..e1b6b32 100644 (file)
@@ -136,6 +136,7 @@ Library
         Data.List
         Data.Maybe
         Data.Monoid
+        Data.OldList
         Data.OldTypeable
         Data.OldTypeable.Internal
         Data.Ord
index 8d5301d..8ab509b 160000 (submodule)
@@ -1 +1 @@
-Subproject commit 8d5301d03f2bb945ef3c7d975dcff3a4d93a0adf
+Subproject commit 8ab509b674c73df2298d0f356b438d7db52896e6
index a97ea9f..51ac61f 160000 (submodule)
@@ -1 +1 @@
-Subproject commit a97ea9fa765b4d8afe44d92470519719a4ede295
+Subproject commit 51ac61ffff22ad23b5c7edc3fcc503af1d88c745
index f0a3f19..057e9b2 100644 (file)
@@ -32,5 +32,5 @@ class (RealFrac a, Floating a) => RealFloat a where
        -- Defined in ‘GHC.Float’
 instance RealFloat Float -- Defined in ‘GHC.Float’
 instance RealFloat Double -- Defined in ‘GHC.Float’
-Data.List.isPrefixOf :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
-       -- Defined in ‘Data.List’
+Data.OldList.isPrefixOf :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
+       -- Defined in ‘Data.OldList’
index 1cbad60..3abb140 100644 (file)
@@ -160,4 +160,4 @@ main = do
 
 
     roll :: [Word8] -> Integer
-    roll = foldr (\b a -> a `shiftL` 8 .|. fromIntegral b) 0
+    roll = GHC.Base.foldr (\b a -> a `shiftL` 8 .|. fromIntegral b) 0
index e8e8f39..38f013e 100644 (file)
@@ -7,5 +7,6 @@ T1972.hs:14:3: Warning:
     This binding for ‘mapAccumL’ shadows the existing bindings
       defined at T1972.hs:16:1
       imported from ‘Data.List’ at T1972.hs:7:1-16
+      (and originally defined in ‘Data.OldList’)
 
 T1972.hs:20:10: Warning: Defined but not used: ‘c’
index 2a21a18..fc8004d 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,7 @@
 module T7963a where
 
+import Prelude ()
+import Data.OldList
+
 unlines = concat
 
index 38ffb08..80fad23 100644 (file)
@@ -3,6 +3,7 @@ rnfail040.hs:7:12:
     Conflicting exports for ‘nub’:
        ‘module M’ exports ‘M.nub’
          imported from ‘Data.List’ at rnfail040.hs:10:2-22
+         (and originally defined in ‘Data.OldList’)
        ‘module M’ exports ‘T.nub’
          imported from ‘Rnfail040_A’ at rnfail040.hs:11:2-24
          (and originally defined at Rnfail040_A.hs:2:3-5)